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Auror
01-19-2014, 06:34 PM
The stock market is very volatile. Market values of stocks go up and down each and every single day. But there are times when the stock prices go on an upward trend (bullish) and there are times when they are in a downward trend (bullish). When the market trend of stocks is bearish, should we still invest in stocks? Or should we just hold on to our money until the market becomes bullish again? What do you think?

delusional
01-20-2014, 02:04 AM
The stock market is very volatile. Market values of stocks go up and down each and every single day. But there are times when the stock prices go on an upward trend (bullish) and there are times when they are in a downward trend (bullish). When the market trend of stocks is bearish, should we still invest in stocks? Or should we just hold on to our money until the market becomes bullish again? What do you think?

When the market is going down, it's called bearish but I think you just missed the word there.

About the question: I depends. A lot of people invest when the stock price is going down (or estimate when it is at it's lowest). But what if a stock keeps floating at a particular value and you know that the stock will rise at the end of the year?
Take the stock of Google for example. You know their stock is going to plummet but it's also rising almost constantly. So if you want a piece of the action, you invest even if the stock is bullish.

There are a lot more factors to think about than just going up or down.

crimsonghost747
01-20-2014, 04:49 AM
Some investors base their investments just on numbers. This is most often the short term way, they buy and sell withint a short perioid of time. I personally prefer to go the other way, investing long term in companies. I choose my companies based on their business model and their profit history as well as a couple of other facts. If you are in it for the long term and you invest in quality companies, you are very likely to eventually make profit.

oxpaulo
01-20-2014, 10:28 AM
Personally I'm against the whole inner workings of the market. Why is it that if you have some money that you are allowed to make money off of that money? You did nothing, you didn't create anything, you didn't really do any work. It all just seems preposterous to me. Making money off your money is absurd.

CliffLife
01-20-2014, 11:33 AM
Here's the wonderful thing about the stock market. When the market is bearish, is when you really can make money in it. While all stocks are down, people generally stray away from them. However, now is the time to buy! The catch? None. That is thinking you did your due diligence and have been studying the market and particular sectors/stocks you are considering investing in. Here's the difference. Right now is the time to buy short-term investments, not long-term. As long as you keep that in mind, you'll be fine. Just make sure you do the proper research and think outside the box as far as advantages and disadvantages of a particular stock.

Hope that helps!

Auror
01-20-2014, 11:01 PM
Thanks guys. I just needed some advice. My uncle is a manager in a bank and I told him that I wanted to open an online stock exchange account at their bank. He got mad at me and said - "do you want to lose money? The stock market is bearish right now!"

After that talk, I never brought up the stock market again. Probably I'll need to open an account in another bank.

owesem75
01-21-2014, 09:45 AM
Personally I'm against the whole inner workings of the market. Why is it that if you have some money that you are allowed to make money off of that money? You did nothing, you didn't create anything, you didn't really do any work. It all just seems preposterous to me. Making money off your money is absurd.

When you buy shares of stocks, you are buying a piece of a company that owns the stock. Your money is then being used by the company for their expansion. Companies that are listed on the Stock Exchange are publicly offering shares and therefore their financial statements are open for public examination. When the business do well and they declare dividends (profit), you will get some income based on the number of shares you hold. I personally do not think it is absurd in making money out of your money, it is basically the same thing as putting up your own business, the only difference is that you are just buying shares of an established companies rather starting a new one of your own.

Now, to answer the question on this thread - I would rather invest based on the company's fundamentals regardless whether the stock market is bullish or bearish. It is better to buy a wonderful company at a fair price than a fair company at a wonderful price.

CliffLife
01-21-2014, 10:38 PM
Thanks guys. I just needed some advice. My uncle is a manager in a bank and I told him that I wanted to open an online stock exchange account at their bank. He got mad at me and said - "do you want to lose money? The stock market is bearish right now!"

After that talk, I never brought up the stock market again. Probably I'll need to open an account in another bank.
Auror, to be honest, you really don't even need to open up a new bank account to purchase shares of stock. Look at some of the online stock brokerages that are out there and decide which is best for you. In general, most require a bare minimum of $500 to open an online brokerage account. Which, if you're investing for profits, $500 would be the very least I'd suggest.
Personally, I've been working with TD Ameritrade for quite some time now, but that's because they cater to my specific needs when I'm purchasing/selling on the market. Everything with the stock market is all about research, including which brokerage you decide to use.

P.S.: Keep an eye on Sprint stock within the next coming year. Stock Symbol: S

Hope this helps.

crimsonghost747
01-22-2014, 05:35 AM
Personally I'm against the whole inner workings of the market. Why is it that if you have some money that you are allowed to make money off of that money? You did nothing, you didn't create anything, you didn't really do any work. It all just seems preposterous to me. Making money off your money is absurd.

When you think about it like that... yes it's absurd. But in the end it's about owning the company. Instead of starting a tiny company and trying to make it grow into a massive global one, you are buying a part of a company like this from someone who invested in it before you.

It's agree that it's a bit strange but ohh well, if I can produce more money with the ones I have... why not do it?

cpefley
01-22-2014, 11:04 AM
I agree, when stocks are down, it can be a great time to invest, because the market is likely to go back up. I have lost out on a few companies that have gone bankrupt, but that is why it is basically a form of legal gambling. The old saying, "Buy low, sell high" is basically very logical advice. Everyone wishes they could do that. Sometimes you buy low and it never recovers, but many do! The stock market is a sordid, twisted game, but you can make millions!

dnotsominor
02-06-2014, 02:11 PM
All companies are going to have bears and bulls. The key is to analyze the financial data. Plus there are a ton of tools I like to use in conjunction with one another to make moves in and out of a business. Personally I use the Moving Average, MACD, RSI, and Slow Stochastic to determine the buying point. The most important thing is to make sure you are investing in a business with strong year over year growth, especially if you are investing long. You don't appear to be day trading, so strong yoy growth is key.

sdsnook
02-06-2014, 03:07 PM
Just listened and read a very interesting article on this, here's the link: (look past the religion, he has some powerful investing knowledge) http://w3.newsmax.com/newsletters/uwr/video_money_code_intl.cfm?promo_code=146F3-1

Basically, what he says is that YES now is the time to invest. Everything is down and priced for us (Me) poor people. It's when the economy is booming that you want to sell... makes perfect sense. Now where is that nest-egg I hid around here. EEK Number one rule he states is "Do not have a LOVE for money!" oppsy!

DomDom
02-06-2014, 05:31 PM
Every long term intelligent investor only invests in bear markets. Thats when the prices are underpriced and going for cheap! The current market isnt underpriced and is quite bullish, now is not the best time to invest! for more information you should read The Intelligent Investor!

owesem75
02-08-2014, 12:41 PM
A stock trader and a stock investor looks at the stock market differently. Trader loves to capitalize on the bear market knowing that the share prices would go up and then sell the stocks they bought at low price. Investors on the other hand look at the company and buy share of those who are in solid grounds regardless whether it is bearish or bullish. They invest long term and earn passive income through dividends.

DomDom
02-08-2014, 04:47 PM
A stock trader and a stock investor looks at the stock market differently. Trader loves to capitalize on the bear market knowing that the share prices would go up and then sell the stocks they bought at low price. Investors on the other hand look at the company and buy share of those who are in solid grounds regardless whether it is bearish or bullish. They invest long term and earn passive income through dividends.

I think investors are the one capitalizing on the bear markets, traders are mostly speculators working in any kind of market.

delusional
02-09-2014, 03:33 PM
I think investors are the one capitalizing on the bear markets, traders are mostly speculators working in any kind of market.

That depends. I don't think you can call the market bearish if the stocks are just released. They are low but that's because it's their starting price. So not really bearish.

owesem75
02-10-2014, 02:29 PM
That depends. I don't think you can call the market bearish if the stocks are just released. They are low but that's because it's their starting price. So not really bearish.

One should really know how to read and interpret technical analysis to determine the bearish and bullish stocks. There are so many technical terms such as the PE ratio, trade volumes, etc that you really need to understand to make a timely decision.

However, stock market is NOT always about numbers. It is a general representation of the people (stock market participants) views and perception about the economy. Imagine how the stock market react to occurrences that is happening around the world? The general reaction can be seen in the fluctuation of numbers and it is what actually is recorded which can eventually be analysed. The pattern it creates will just show you cycles (pattern) and be able to predict possible (same) event in the future so you could make a timely decision.

Good luck!

DomDom
02-10-2014, 02:37 PM
That depends. I don't think you can call the market bearish if the stocks are just released. They are low but that's because it's their starting price. So not really bearish.

I respectfully disagree. You CAN call the market generally bearish or bullish depending on the measurables (as previously said general market P/E for example.). In bullish markets newly released stocks mostly get overpriced and in the bearish markets they can be underpriced.

By the way the P/E ratio is not a technical term but actually a fundamental analysis term...

crimsonghost747
02-10-2014, 04:41 PM
Basically, what he says is that YES now is the time to invest. Everything is down and priced for us (Me) poor people. It's when the economy is booming that you want to sell... makes perfect sense. Now where is that nest-egg I hid around here. EEK Number one rule he states is "Do not have a LOVE for money!" oppsy!

Stock indexes are actually at a very high point currently. Now I believe that our current economy is NOT doing well, so these two would lead me to believe that in general the stock market is overpriced. I still keep buying (in small quantities) but I also have quite a lot of cash to use in case of a downward correction move.

pahagwl
02-14-2014, 12:49 AM
In a market dominated by the bears, I would recommend you to try 'shorting' the stocks. Shorting means that you sell a stock which you do not already own. It is generally done when you expect the price of a particular stock to fall lower then its current level. After the price has fallen, you can then buyback the stock and pocket the difference. A lot of day-traders use this strategy but I would recommend you to be extremely careful while employing this strategy.

owesem75
02-14-2014, 01:22 AM
Unless you are a well experienced trader and lots of money to invest, I really find a day-trading a very very very high-risk strategy.

I have been reading finance-related books authored by a well known writer, Mr. Robert Kiyosaki, and he really got my attention about his view on the stock market and somehow, I could understand his point. Perhaps I am just cautious that I rather stay invested long-term and do cost averaging strategy, or.. I really don't know the stock market trading at all!

Taru
02-14-2014, 03:42 PM
I think both bearish and bullish markets carry with them their own risks, and it might help not to look at those factors exclusively when deciding. Even when a certain entity is moving up, there is still a chance that it goes up or down and both scenarios will always be possible for any type of market. The best thing to do, in my opinion, is to scrutinize each potential investment as much as possible and to always rely on facts that relate to them rather than using what state they are in currently to tell where they potentially could go.

crimsonghost747
02-15-2014, 07:26 AM
Unless you are a well experienced trader and lots of money to invest, I really find a day-trading a very very very high-risk strategy.

I have been reading finance-related books authored by a well known writer, Mr. Robert Kiyosaki, and he really got my attention about his view on the stock market and somehow, I could understand his point. Perhaps I am just cautious that I rather stay invested long-term and do cost averaging strategy, or.. I really don't know the stock market trading at all!

Yes day trading is very very risky. However trading doesn't have to be done within the day, the only trades I've ever made were a couple days to a couple of weeks.

DomDom
02-16-2014, 02:48 PM
Yes day trading is very very risky. However trading doesn't have to be done within the day, the only trades I've ever made were a couple days to a couple of weeks.

I have a goal of being a part time swing trader. If only I could get to 25-30% yearly as a part time job I would be financially free in no time (10 years)

What are your goals ?

crimsonghost747
02-16-2014, 04:59 PM
I have a goal of being a part time swing trader. If only I could get to 25-30% yearly as a part time job I would be financially free in no time (10 years)

What are your goals ?

I would love to be able to do trading but I know it's not for me so I steer clear.
I invest in profitable companies, usually ones that are the leaders in their own industry. Steady growth, steady increases to dividends and in the long run I know that I can make a profit.

I don't necessarily ever plan on selling my shares, I buy & hold and enjoy the dividends. If one day I could live just on dividend income that would be great, but not very likely to happen.

gHiros
02-16-2014, 05:52 PM
I would love to be able to do trading but I know it's not for me so I steer clear.
I invest in profitable companies, usually ones that are the leaders in their own industry. Steady growth, steady increases to dividends and in the long run I know that I can make a profit.

I don't necessarily ever plan on selling my shares, I buy & hold and enjoy the dividends. If one day I could live just on dividend income that would be great, but not very likely to happen.

Sounds like a plan! I suppose in a bear market, it's good to diversify your portfolio to include resource companies (e.g., for energy or food related). That way, you can collect on dividends like crimsonghost747.

arupmi
02-18-2014, 08:42 AM
It's always scary to allocate investment money when the market is diving. But if you have a company with solid fundamentals, then it may be the ideal opportunity to invest when the stock price has been knocked down a bit. You have to have some amount of contrarian thinking within you - go against the herd! If you have done your research properly, then you are bound to produce excellent results by investing when the markets are down.

crimsonghost747
02-18-2014, 01:26 PM
It's always scary to allocate investment money when the market is diving. But if you have a company with solid fundamentals, then it may be the ideal opportunity to invest when the stock price has been knocked down a bit. You have to have some amount of contrarian thinking within you - go against the herd! If you have done your research properly, then you are bound to produce excellent results by investing when the markets are down.

Excellent posts. "Buy when there is blood on the streets."
It's quite simple really, short term problems will not cause a strong company to fall to it's knees. Especially if said company operates globally. However when the brown matter hits the fan people tend to panic and a lot of them sell everything they have. That is when it's good to buy the shares of that very same company which will do really well when the crisis is over, just for a very cheap price.

mikka254
02-18-2014, 04:15 PM
I agree, when stocks are down, it can be a great time to invest, because the market is likely to go back up. I have lost out on a few companies that have gone bankrupt, but that is why it is basically a form of legal gambling. The old saying, "Buy low, sell high" is basically very logical advice. Everyone wishes they could do that. Sometimes you buy low and it never recovers, but many do! The stock market is a sordid, twisted game, but you can make millions!
I like that you called the stock market what it really is, gambling. Making money in the stock market is basically gambling and that's why it is advisable to only invest with a profit that you have made from a business venture instead of trying to make the stock market your sole source of income.

DomDom
02-18-2014, 05:46 PM
I would love to be able to do trading but I know it's not for me so I steer clear.
I invest in profitable companies, usually ones that are the leaders in their own industry. Steady growth, steady increases to dividends and in the long run I know that I can make a profit.

I don't necessarily ever plan on selling my shares, I buy & hold and enjoy the dividends. If one day I could live just on dividend income that would be great, but not very likely to happen.

Why do you say it is not for you ? I am not certain if I am the right fit either but I will give it a try :)

crimsonghost747
02-19-2014, 04:08 AM
Why do you say it is not for you ? I am not certain if I am the right fit either but I will give it a try :)

I just don't enjoy the idea of day trading. I have and will continue to do some small trades on a longer time period (weeks, months) when I'm fairly certain of profit.
But my main strategy is very long term and doesn't really require me to spend my days crunching numbers. I'm also confident in my abilities, so there really is no stress. With day trading I know my emotions would get involved and that is NOT what I'm looking for.

fredkawig
02-19-2014, 07:45 AM
I would invest in the stock market when all the stocks plummet to the floor. And when the stocks go up to the ceiling I would sell it quickly. That's my strategy if I go into stocks. I have been oriented a little in stocks and have not personally tried it but I get the concept. I want to trade stocks in the future but I have no time to go to our local stock exchange since I'm still in school.

crimsonghost747
02-19-2014, 02:24 PM
I would invest in the stock market when all the stocks plummet to the floor. And when the stocks go up to the ceiling I would sell it quickly. That's my strategy if I go into stocks. I have been oriented a little in stocks and have not personally tried it but I get the concept. I want to trade stocks in the future but I have no time to go to our local stock exchange since I'm still in school.

Ohh wow. So I should buy when it's cheap and sell when it's expensive?! DAMN!

No but more seriously now, obviously everyone tries to do it. Now all we need is a crystal ball that tells us when we are at the bottom and when we are at the top.

jubvman
02-20-2014, 06:54 AM
Read up on Warren Buffett's techniques, it's a little similar to what you are talking about. Good luck in your trading :D

WeDontSleep
02-22-2014, 05:43 AM
I think that you should invest in a bearish market, if you are very familiar with the company. In some cases going against the popular opinion is a really good thing and the fact that you aren't overlooking bearish markets is a good sign.

delusional
02-22-2014, 02:54 PM
I think that you should invest in a bearish market, if you are very familiar with the company. In some cases going against the popular opinion is a really good thing and the fact that you aren't overlooking bearish markets is a good sign.

I think this is true. In the past week, I made several smaller investments because the stock price of some business was dropping and I knew they are going to skyrocket in a few weeks.

DomDom
02-22-2014, 06:24 PM
I think this is true. In the past week, I made several smaller investments because the stock price of some business was dropping and I knew they are going to skyrocket in a few weeks.

If the company you are investing in in a bearish market has really strong fundamentals there is really no reason to be afraid. The worth will go up sooner or later :)

apexa1
02-23-2014, 03:06 AM
Hmm good point. Never really thought of that. How do you know about their fundamentals though?

owesem75
02-23-2014, 07:40 AM
Hmm good point. Never really thought of that. How do you know about their fundamentals though?

You can easily get these information from your stock broker. If not, you can find it on the company's website. If you bought some shares of stocks of a particular company, you have the right to check these fundamental records. Beside, once a company is listed, it has the obligation to share information to the investing PUBLIC.

crimsonghost747
02-23-2014, 11:49 AM
I think this is true. In the past week, I made several smaller investments because the stock price of some business was dropping and I knew they are going to skyrocket in a few weeks.

Don't use the word "know" when it comes to predicting the future.
Because if you know that a company is going to skyrocket, you go to a bank, get a big loan, load up on a volatile instrument and spend the rest of your days on a beach talking to bikini models instead of us. :p

DomDom
02-23-2014, 02:55 PM
You can easily get these information from your stock broker. If not, you can find it on the company's website. If you bought some shares of stocks of a particular company, you have the right to check these fundamental records. Beside, once a company is listed, it has the obligation to share information to the investing PUBLIC.

www.nasdaq.com is the page where you can find the companies spreadsheets (assets debts etc)!

crimsonghost747
02-24-2014, 04:36 AM
www.nasdaq.com is the page where you can find the companies spreadsheets (assets debts etc)!

Yep. You also have a lot of other options such as google finance and yahoo finance... and multiple others.
Personally I use yahoo finance for the basic stuff, then if I'm happy with those and still thinking of buying I use google and obviously check out a couple of financial statements from their website.

Francisco23
02-28-2014, 05:09 PM
The stock market is very volatile. Market values of stocks go up and down each and every single day. But there are times when the stock prices go on an upward trend (bullish) and there are times when they are in a downward trend (bullish). When the market trend of stocks is bearish, should we still invest in stocks? Or should we just hold on to our money until the market becomes bullish again? What do you think?

I invest in any market. It's just a matter of knowing when to buy from when to sell. It's all about learning to read your charts using the right indicators and trend analysis. You have to know how to take the least risks and make the greatest gains.

DomDom
03-01-2014, 03:46 PM
Yep. You also have a lot of other options such as google finance and yahoo finance... and multiple others.
Personally I use yahoo finance for the basic stuff, then if I'm happy with those and still thinking of buying I use google and obviously check out a couple of financial statements from their website.

Yeah there are alot of good sites. I personall also use gurufocus.com too. I prefer nasdaq for the basics because its very simple for navigation.

crimsonghost747
03-01-2014, 07:12 PM
Yeah there are alot of good sites. I personall also use gurufocus.com too. I prefer nasdaq for the basics because its very simple for navigation.

That looks like an interesting website for finding new stocks to take a deeper look at. Too bad they require you to sign up (and probably pay) for most of the information. Any other websites which you use?

I find stocks mainly by talking with other investors on certain forums. Then I use yahoo finance for the basics and then obviously go through the quarterly and yearly reports and anything else interesting I can find on the company's website.

Lostvalleyguy
03-01-2014, 08:33 PM
If you are able to estimate the true value of a stock and the price has dipped below that value then it makes sense to buy. Whether you make or lose money will depend on your ability to correctly estimate the value. If you do your homework, there is money to be made in a bearish market, but you really do have to know what you are doing. Much of investing in the market is logical and straight forward, but the trying to outguess human behavior portion is tough.

DomDom
03-02-2014, 02:37 PM
That looks like an interesting website for finding new stocks to take a deeper look at. Too bad they require you to sign up (and probably pay) for most of the information. Any other websites which you use?

I find stocks mainly by talking with other investors on certain forums. Then I use yahoo finance for the basics and then obviously go through the quarterly and yearly reports and anything else interesting I can find on the company's website.

I find stocks mostly using google finance. You have a great search option there, you can adjust P/E,balance sheet,debt to equity etc in the search and look for what you think is most important. I go through alot of pages and find interesting things! :)

crimsonghost747
03-02-2014, 03:02 PM
I find stocks mostly using google finance. You have a great search option there, you can adjust P/E,balance sheet,debt to equity etc in the search and look for what you think is most important. I go through alot of pages and find interesting things! :)

Sounds great. I'll definitely take a look there the next time I'm looking for something to buy! Looks yummy!

danderson239
03-02-2014, 03:59 PM
"The only guaranteed way to get hurt riding a roller coaster is to jump off.". -Dave Ramsey

The nature of the stock market is to have ups and downs, just like businesses have ups and downs. You need to have a long-term view in mind. Ride out the storm, and you'll likely gain back your losses. Given that businesses invest as well - if the market ever completely crashed, we're all doomed. It wouldn't matter where your money is.

crimsonghost747
03-03-2014, 03:21 AM
"The only guaranteed way to get hurt riding a roller coaster is to jump off.". -Dave Ramsey

The nature of the stock market is to have ups and downs, just like businesses have ups and downs. You need to have a long-term view in mind. Ride out the storm, and you'll likely gain back your losses. Given that businesses invest as well - if the market ever completely crashed, we're all doomed. It wouldn't matter where your money is.

Yep, though IF your long term view is that the company is doomed then obviously you need to jump out as soon as you can. You have your ups and downs, it's just that with some companies the general direction is up and with others it's down.

pahagwl
03-03-2014, 01:58 PM
"The only guaranteed way to get hurt riding a roller coaster is to jump off.". -Dave Ramsey

The nature of the stock market is to have ups and downs, just like businesses have ups and downs. You need to have a long-term view in mind. Ride out the storm, and you'll likely gain back your losses. Given that businesses invest as well - if the market ever completely crashed, we're all doomed. It wouldn't matter where your money is.
I completely agree with this point and I would like to impress upon the fact that its very essential that you have a long term perspective when you start investing in the stock market. I would also like to impress upon the importance of being able to recognize those companies/businesses which are stable and will be able to post good growth in the future. It is only then, you will be able to get stable and good returns from your investments.

DomDom
03-04-2014, 04:12 PM
I completely agree with this point and I would like to impress upon the fact that its very essential that you have a long term perspective when you start investing in the stock market. I would also like to impress upon the importance of being able to recognize those companies/businesses which are stable and will be able to post good growth in the future. It is only then, you will be able to get stable and good returns from your investments.

Thats the basis of investing for the worlds richest investors (Warren Buffett). Mr. Market will come to your home every day with a price, if its too low you dont have to sell. Weather the storm and sell it when he offers you an unbelievable price.

Oivas
03-10-2014, 08:00 AM
The stock market is very volatile. Market values of stocks go up and down each and every single day. But there are times when the stock prices go on an upward trend (bullish) and there are times when they are in a downward trend (bullish). When the market trend of stocks is bearish, should we still invest in stocks? Or should we just hold on to our money until the market becomes bullish again? What do you think?

Bearish phase is considered to be the best phase for investing (however investing in which stock is a different art and requires research). As Warren Buffet himself says that approach with caution when the world is bullish and go ahead and invest when the world is bearish. Of course, I have put his thoughts in my words. So, bearish market is the right time to select good stocks and invest.

idlecuriosities
03-10-2014, 11:45 AM
I don't think the overall trend of the market should impact how you invest in the market. i think what is more important is where you invest your money. The rollercoaster metaphor is great for describing this situation. Just be smart with who you choose to invest your money with. Even then there is no such thing as a guaranteed pay day when dealing with stocks.

DomDom
03-10-2014, 04:43 PM
Bearish phase is considered to be the best phase for investing (however investing in which stock is a different art and requires research). As Warren Buffet himself says that approach with caution when the world is bullish and go ahead and invest when the world is bearish. Of course, I have put his thoughts in my words. So, bearish market is the right time to select good stocks and invest.

Bearish markets are the best places to find great fundamental value in stocks.

PaulCargo
10-27-2014, 07:27 AM
I didn't have a single idea of the bearish market, So I have to think so much before investing in the bearish market. Once I got the idea of bearish market I must want to invest in bearish market.

thomasjessie345
11-07-2014, 04:23 AM
Investing in stock market is quiet a risky thing, because it goes up and down suddenly. But if you can see it on a regular basis or can give your full time then you can take a chance of investing in it.

Paul Josaph
11-11-2014, 05:52 AM
These are just two of the more common strategies and there is a wide range of other strategies tailored to a bear market. The most important thing is to understand that a bear market is a very difficult one for long investors because most stocks fall over the period, and most strategies can only limit the amount of downside exposure, not eliminate it.

David T. Breen
11-19-2014, 11:49 PM
Below are five investment decision options for bearish investors, with some riskier than others.
Defensive stocks
High-quality corporate bonds
Inverse exchange-traded funds
Contrarian mutual funds
Global stocks

Grabowski
11-29-2014, 08:04 AM
I think investing in Panda coins and bit coins is more beneficial then investing in a stock or bearish market.