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DomDom
01-31-2014, 06:55 AM
Hey guys, how do you interview new employees ? Share your tips, tricks and advice here! I am pretty inexperience with this so I would love to hear some comments!

wander_n_wonder
01-31-2014, 01:04 PM
I never interview in a structured way. Of course, you will go through the basics like finding out about the education and previous work experience. As much as possible, however, I make sure that I focus on the candidate and have a discussion instead of an interview. I treat it as a conversation, the same way that I would converse with someone that I care for. This way, I get to know more about the candidate and if he or she is suitable for the role. I also make sure that I have a friendly relationship with candidates. If they don't get shortlisted, I tell them honestly and give them improvement points.

Bizwiz1011
01-31-2014, 08:49 PM
The interview style you should have is a casual one. Everyone is prepares for canned questions, and those questions are robotic to begin with. Give them a curveball question and their real personality will come through.

fredkawig
02-01-2014, 01:38 AM
You should find out first and foremost the skills that the interviewee could offer. Depending on your business you must have a criteria and a chart of skills that is required in order for a prospect interviewee to pass. You should also look into the work ethic of the person, If she or he is willing to learn and is a humble employee then that's a good sign of a good and hardworking employee. For me the belief system is the most important and the attitude which is why I look for Christians who fear God and have respect for their fellow human beings. Work on these tips and you'll never go wrong.

oregano
02-01-2014, 05:12 AM
You always need to be sure that the candidate has the skills, experience, motivation and energy required for the job you're trying to fill, so you do need to get him or her to convince you that these are all in place. Depending on your interviewing style and the impression you want to give the candidate about the company and about you as a potential boss, you can make this a structured interview where you ask direct questions, and perhaps get the candidate to give examples of how he would deal with a situation, for example, or you can make it more casual and conversational.

If you favor the more formal, structured approach, there are many examples of interview questions to be found via Google. If you want to be more casual, you might treat your meeting as more of a conversation between (near-) equals who have both been in the industry for a while and know what they're doing. In other words, in my experience at least, an informal interview tends to work best with mid to senior-level candidates where skills and experience are well documented, and for whom personality fit in your organization can be a major factor.

jubvman
02-01-2014, 12:14 PM
I think obviously the first thing to go through would be the basics, as an above poster said such as finding out about education and recent employment. But after that I think it's pretty much a case-by-case basis. Every employee will be different and so it's important to interview them in different ways.

DomDom
02-01-2014, 12:48 PM
I think the best thing for me would be to mix up the casual and structured parts. That way I can throw them off a little bit but also see how good they are at preparing for questions they know I will ask!
How do you guys see who is motivated and will do the work vs those who are just faking to be employed?

Thanks for the replies too! :)

swagger
02-01-2014, 06:47 PM
Ask them questions such as things about their life, how they would handle certain situations if placed in them, and find out their past, such as education and criminal charges.

delusional
02-02-2014, 11:06 AM
Be prepared, read their resume, write down things that look strange or interesting and try to find some more information about the person online.
It might not be that ethical but I always Google the name of the person I'm going to interview. Just to get an idea of what kind of person he/she is and also because in my field of business, having somewhat of a decent online presence is helpful.

A lot of people have already told a lot of valid things to ask. I would also ask "If I google you, what would I find?" and see what he/she answers. This way you can get a feel of how honest people are.

DomDom
02-02-2014, 02:16 PM
Be prepared, read their resume, write down things that look strange or interesting and try to find some more information about the person online.
It might not be that ethical but I always Google the name of the person I'm going to interview. Just to get an idea of what kind of person he/she is and also because in my field of business, having somewhat of a decent online presence is helpful.

A lot of people have already told a lot of valid things to ask. I would also ask "If I google you, what would I find?" and see what he/she answers. This way you can get a feel of how honest people are.

Ohhhh that one is good it gave me a chuckle :D
Thanks for the tips guys Ill write these down! If you have any more advice, write it down!

Lodismel
02-02-2014, 02:28 PM
It is definitely a good idea to google people these days. The amount of information about people is pretty astounding. It's good to know a bit about people that you can prepare questions more tailored to each person. Normally I would go with the more casual interview. The best way to see what somebody is really like is to make them comfortable. If someone isn't comfortable they are much more likely to spew out the same drudge that everybody says during an interview. Honestly, hearing someone talk about how hard a worker they are just isn't useful.

owesem75
02-02-2014, 04:23 PM
One of professor in Management shared one TIP in doing interview. He said, to know more about the person (beyond his skills), is to ask him/her if he/she knows how to cook and ask him/her to share about his/her cooking habit.

My professor said, if the person loves to cook - and depending on how he/she relate his/her cooking habit, it will show you how the person think (in terms of the dish to cook and the way he/she gathers and prepares the ingredients), how organize he/she is (in the way he present the cooking procedure), and what cooking for him/her is all about - and then you will find his total personality. Most people who love to cook are happy to please people with their dishes and proud about what they have accomplished.

Andy1982
02-03-2014, 09:39 AM
I would lay out a few target bullet points that you want the answers to such as:-

1. Previous experience if any they can bring?
2. Are they a good team player or do they work better on their own?
3. What do they expect to get out of applying for you job?
4. How do they feel their personality will fit into your environment?

Something along those lines allow you to find out the maximum about the applicant without making them feel too intimidated. There's nothing worse than putting the fear of God into an already nervous person. If they relax and give you the information you're looking for, it makes the process smoother altogether.

nowicki2013
02-03-2014, 11:45 AM
The first thing I do is go over their resume with them. I might have a couple of questions about their past work experience I'd like to ask them. That way I can hear it out of their mouth instead of just on a piece of paper. Then I like to just have a casual conversation with them to see how their personality is. In doing this I'll be able to tell if they'll be able to work well with the rest of my employees. If they're too arrogant then they don't have a chance. If they seem nice and trustworthy I'll usually set them up with a second interview.

DomDom
02-03-2014, 03:49 PM
One of professor in Management shared one TIP in doing interview. He said, to know more about the person (beyond his skills), is to ask him/her if he/she knows how to cook and ask him/her to share about his/her cooking habit.

My professor said, if the person loves to cook - and depending on how he/she relate his/her cooking habit, it will show you how the person think (in terms of the dish to cook and the way he/she gathers and prepares the ingredients), how organize he/she is (in the way he present the cooking procedure), and what cooking for him/her is all about - and then you will find his total personality. Most people who love to cook are happy to please people with their dishes and proud about what they have accomplished.

As a person who loves to cook this sounds very interesting haha! According to this I would be a great employee!

Thanks for your answers Andy and nowicki!

gHiros
02-04-2014, 01:48 AM
When I interview someone, I try to make the job applicant as comfortable as possible, put them in a relax state so that they don't feel like they're facing a firing squad. I know how that feels because I was involved in an interview like that and it was brutal. My approach is to make the interview more conversational and be part of a two-way discussion, rather than just firing away with cold questions and putting the prospective job applicant on the spot. That said, you should be a good listener, too, while conducting the interview, as you'll learn a lot about the prospective job applicant.

Good Luck!

hillaryNC
02-04-2014, 11:55 AM
I think the main thing is getting the interviewee to act like their normal self. I have been in interviews, and the person who was doing it was very imitating and almost looked down on me! In other interviews the person doing it made me feel really comfortable and I could act like myself and I think they got a better idea of what I was really like. You should try to make them feel comfortable and ask them questions that relate to the job. I have had job interviews for some places, and the questions they ask you.. would make you wonder if you were in a med school interview! Just keep it relevant!!

KaplanTheThird
02-04-2014, 04:26 PM
I say it really depends on your work environment. If there is a lot of pressure then maybe an interview a'la firing squad is not a bad idea. When I started running a small store I needed employees who could handle both me and my demanding customers and keep a smile on. I tried to make the interviews unpredictable and serious. After that episode in life I started working in a much more laid back environment and I would take potential candidates for coffee and a walk outdoors if it was nice. I always try to get to know them and try to see if they are a hard worker and intelligent. You are looking for people that not only will fit the role, but also fit the environment. Sometimes the interviews are very short, sometimes they take very long. I never got it to an exact science. Every interview has 1 element that never changes. On my first ever interview I was asked "If you where a kitchen appliance what would you be?" and I've asked that question every interview since, usually with a weird smile on my face.

Taru
02-18-2014, 08:59 PM
When I'm interviewing, I mostly just ask some of my own basic questions that informs me as to what type of person they are with regards to how passionate they would be for the job I'm hiring them for. I think it's the detail I look for the most, because a passionate person will tend to learn a lot better and will usually be the best at critical thinking for some minor decisions that I may not be present for. Basically, I do enough digging to find out if they have some leadership potential, not necessarily to lead a team but just enough to lead themselves. Also, I look at their personality if they are the type who would mesh well with my current set of employees.

CSomm
02-18-2014, 10:10 PM
I think that standard questions are a complete waste of time. Anything I can learn from you by asking canned questions, I'd be better off learning from your references, your online presence, and your background check. Unconventional questions reveal your personality by throwing you off your game---that's the real person, dealing with questions they were expecting. I can learn how you respond under pressure, and how quick of a thinker you are. I can learn if you like my jokes, and if we are going to get along---and if you are going to get along with the team I've painstakingly built, more importantly.

Radium
02-21-2014, 02:04 PM
Depends entirely on what the job I need filled but generally I have one interview over the phone and another longer face to face before I make my decision. I find it helps to have more casual interviews, the candidates are usually more relaxed and you can really see what they are like compared to the usual formal interviews which I find to be too rigid and not good for actually determining what the employee will be like once he's in the job.
It's important to take notes constantly, have a checklist of what you're looking for and what the candidate brings to the table through their application, phone interview and the face to face. This way you have a far better idea of who's the right candidate should you find them.

alec
02-22-2014, 04:59 AM
First we have a quick interview by phone where I usually test the language skills then check some of the resume info. If I'm satisfied with what I hear we set a date for a face to face interview. When we're finally face to face I use a mix of standard questions with open discussion. While the standard questions help weed out some of the candidates the final choice I make is based on how they perform in the open discussion. If I'm hiring for a customer oriented job (for example support via phone) we roleplay some client-support situations to see how they handle interactions. Now, if I'm hiring for a more practical position where specific skills are required we may add some additional on the filed testing.

sofieb529
02-22-2014, 09:06 AM
Since I'm running two small businesses from home and have two small children I conduct all preliminary interviews over the phone. For me this has worked out the best. I find my interviews are more efficient and more conducive to my schedule. I am nervous myself when talking to a new person so its easier for me over the phone.

autograph
02-22-2014, 10:32 AM
I recommend you to conduct 2 sets of interviews.
This first interview is done via the phone. This is your initial screening phase. Ask the candidates all basic questions that are important. Make sure that you have covered any basic questions and ensure that the candidate really does fit your requirements. This is to ensure that both of your time are not wasted; you would not want to invite somebody for interviews only to find out that he requires sponsorship, etc.
The second one will be face-to-face interviews. This is where you would ask more technical stuffs and gauge how well will you be working together with the candidates. This is where you decide to offer the job or not.

Mojibobo
02-22-2014, 11:44 AM
I've never interviewed anyone, but just be casual about it. Ask the questions and really there is nothing to worry about, always remember they are the ones that are scared and nervous.

crucider
02-22-2014, 11:58 AM
Your interview questions should all be just going word to word from a piece of paper/document. You can do some of the initial questions that are pre-made but I think each interview should be each unique so you get a better understanding of that person.

panderson248
02-22-2014, 05:06 PM
Just be yourself and act professional. Its as simple as that.

M.K
02-22-2014, 05:58 PM
Ask unexpected questions. Many interviewees will have memorized or at least thought about how to answer stock questions. Instead of asking "What things are you good at?" ask "What inspires you?". Try to catch them off-guard, that's when you'll start to see their real personalities.

DomDom
02-22-2014, 06:30 PM
Ask unexpected questions. Many interviewees will have memorized or at least thought about how to answer stock questions. Instead of asking "What things are you good at?" ask "What inspires you?". Try to catch them off-guard, that's when you'll start to see their real personalities.

I agree! Everybody will prepare for easy questions, quick thinking can be seen with unexpected questions.

samm1973
02-23-2014, 09:27 PM
I haven't had to interview someone in a long time, but I remember something that really helped me was to make the interviewee comfortable. When someone is comfortable they'll give you the most honest answer. Ask them how they'd respond to situations, but make sure you don't get too familiar, because that can lead them down the path of making light of stressful situations. That's not fair to them at all. It would feel like baiting them into giving horrible answers.

sofieb529
02-24-2014, 08:14 AM
Be prepared, read their resume, write down things that look strange or interesting and try to find some more information about the person online.
It might not be that ethical but I always Google the name of the person I'm going to interview. Just to get an idea of what kind of person he/she is and also because in my field of business, having somewhat of a decent online presence is helpful.

A lot of people have already told a lot of valid things to ask. I would also ask "If I google you, what would I find?" and see what he/she answers. This way you can get a feel of how honest people are.


I really like the google question! I am going to use that! Thanks for sharing!

wander_n_wonder
03-14-2014, 12:01 AM
One of the things that I learned is letting go of the CV and just really talking to the person face-to-face. Most interviewers are guilty of merely verifying the information stated in the CV. If you do that, you fail to see more about the candidate. You are only hitting the superficial qualities. What I would usually do is use the CV for about 5 minutes just to establish the basic information. After that, I would put it down on the table and just keep on asking questions based on the dialogue. I would also not prepare questions in advance because I know that would only limit me on what should be asked. This has proven to be very effective so far and I got to hire the most suitable candidates.

mikelouis
03-14-2014, 01:22 AM
An interview is a way of getting to know if the interviewee is able to handle the job effectively or not. First you need to check out the educational qualifications to see if they are the right people for the job. Proceed to asking them questions related to the job and see how fast and confident they reply. Confident employees are the best as they can take on any challenge at hand.

mikka254
03-14-2014, 04:57 AM
The interview is not just about filling the job position, it's about who won't cause problems in the future. If you are interviewing female candidates, look at how they talk or how they dress. Law suits are not good for the company's image therefore pick a professional who is there to work and not someone who thinks that is a dating network. The female candidate should be qualified, mature and decent. Never pick a candidate who does not understand what morals are because the company will pay the price eventually. For male candidate, pick a candidate who understands the role of the job position. Male candidates often act like they know more than the boss once they get too comfortable in the company and this can cause friction. Even if you are hiring an upper level employee, they should understand that the boss is there for a reason. Therefore, it's not just about the diplomas or degrees, it's also about the personality.

Mafdet
03-18-2014, 03:08 PM
I always try to create a relaxed environment. I like to see my candidates at their best and I try to chat with them for a while at the beginning. We hire a lot of young and inexperienced people, some of them having their first interview with us and I see no point in scaring them. Also, I try to ask very specific questions, help them imagine themselves in a particular situation and describe their reaction instead of asking general questions that most interviewers do not even know how to interpret.

GottBiz
03-27-2014, 04:52 AM
Takes a while to develop your own style. When I first started doing interviews I read up on several sites on the internet from both perspectives. The first perspective being the interviewer, and the second perspective being the interviewee. From there I learned what questions most people ask and also what questions most people were prepared for.

In general I liked the relaxed approach where I started with basic "getting to know you" questions and then moved on to more industry specific questions related to their background and experience. Keep in mind that you are hiring someone that you may be working with for quite sometime. Honesty and integrity are important, you want someone you can trust. And it's like a first date, they are giving you their best first impression and you are trying to get beyond the impression and find out who they really are.

gHiros
03-28-2014, 07:25 PM
Hey guys, how do you interview new employees ? Share your tips, tricks and advice here! I am pretty inexperience with this so I would love to hear some comments!

I like to interview in a casual setting. Of course, get all the robotic responses (i.e., education, experience, etc.) out of the way, and start delving into stuff like "Why did you apply for the job?" or "What interested you to this position?" or "What type of community service or volunteer work were you involved with?" or even "Any experiences with mentoring" and so on.

Then I follow those lines of questioning, finding a nice transition during our session, with more "serious" open-ended questions. That's when you can spot the fast thinkers and problem solvers. Open-ended questions can be like a conflict-resolution scenario, where you pose a situation to the interviewee which includes a conflict (e.g., a disagreement with your boss) and having them come up with a solution. Other open-ended questions I like to use are "Why should I hire you?" and "What are qualities of a good leader"?

I usually check to see if the interviewee is taking down notes during our session, and if he/she is maintaining some form of eye contact w/ me. Anyways, I use those things to gauge whether the interviewee is showing any interest in the job or not.

And finally, toward the tail end of the interview, I try to solicit any questions from the interviewee. If he/she comes prepared with a set of questions for me, then you can deduce that he/she has an interest in the job.

Good Luck!

Zwong777
03-29-2014, 02:44 AM
For me, I would do some background research. I mean you have a resume and cover letter presenting information that is said to be factual so before the candidate even enters your office, take some time to verify the information he or she has given you.

Also, have a solid understanding of what qualifications you're seeking in a candidate.

canoe
03-29-2014, 03:33 PM
When you're interviewing someone, keep in mind that you're looking for someone who is not only good at the work they'll being doing but someone you'll enjoy working with everyday for many years. Hiring shouldn't be solely tied to technical ability because a lot of work involves teamwork and chemistry between co-workers will be an important factor work efficiency. That's why like others have said, it's good to hold an interview like a casual conversation so that it helps loosen up the candidate which will enable you to look at the candidate for what he/she really is.

clay1224
03-29-2014, 09:19 PM
Be honest and don't be nervous. If your there for an interview, then you obviously want the job, therefore they are going to know you will be nervous. It's okay to be nervous, just don't let it mess with you.

Ridge Hatrick
04-01-2014, 09:29 PM
I think the best way to perform an interview is to have a genuine conversation with someone. Everyone knows what an interview is, how it generally happens, and had their answers prepared in advance.

I like to just talk to someone, either walking around the work place, or over coffee. Keeping it relaxed, asking questions that have nothing to do with work, and keeping it friendly seem to be good ways to get the PERSON to come out, rather than just rambling to an "applicant". Knowing the person you're trying to hire is important to me, though, as I'm not simply looking for a drone. Drones tend to be slackers and lack the loyalty and dedication I like to see in my employees, not to mention the disparaging quality of their work.

Call your potential employee, see if they want to come in, or meet over coffee for their interview, and just relax. Don't interview your potential employee, have a conversation with them. Potential employees like to know that they can matter, that they're needed or wanted for that position. Sure, an employer might have dozens of potential candidates, but that's no reason to believe or act like they're easily replaceable tools. Not if you want to find an employee worth keeping around, one that wants to stick around and grow as a person while the business grows as well.

canoe
04-02-2014, 08:43 AM
The best tip I ever received was to practice in front of a mirror and to also record yourself interviewing. After recording yourself, watch the video from the perspective of an employer? Do you feel impressed? Does this person (you) look like someone really cool and enthusiastic about the job? I realized how different my feeling of how I looked was from how I actually looked.

ElvisPresley
04-02-2014, 09:16 AM
Go over their resume with them in front of you and then ask them questions pertaining to the job they are applying for. Telll them what the position entails and then ask them how they would handle certain situations.

Rosyrain
04-02-2014, 12:57 PM
A canned question or two during the interview is expected, but go outside the box and ask questions they are not expecting. The potential employee will really have to think about these questions because they were not expecting them, and their true colors will shine through. I also try to stay away from close-ended questions as much as possible. Give the interviewee lots of open ended questions so they have to explain their answers and give examples from previous employment.

sweetkymom
04-02-2014, 09:46 PM
I would suggest a very laid back but professional atmosphere to begin with. Ask questions to get answers that'll benefit your company. Don't take beggers.

Bryan Cassidy
04-03-2014, 12:59 PM
I used to work in investment banking and handled our intern recruiting program. I would say that while it's great to think of general questions before hand and make sure to ask at least one or two of the same to all candidates in order to establish a base line, in general I think trusting your gut is most important. I did interviews where the interviewer clearly went down a list and just checked boxes. This doesn't allow for one to truly see if the candidate would be a good fit and forces the conversation to be artificial and shallow. Focus on really trying to understand what makes the candidate tick and you will find the best employee.

DennisChang
05-12-2014, 03:38 AM
For what kind of jobs? Typically, you will go through their resume and ask about the experiences they stated inside. Ask about what they are expecting from the job, how they think they can contribute to the company, and their vision of their career path.

Resource9
06-03-2014, 03:19 AM
The interview process is different for different kinds of jobs. What position you are referring to?

amardeepets3323
06-18-2014, 06:42 AM
First you see Dressing sense of the employee is proper dressing or not and after that point out the way of talking, check resumes and ask question related to employee experence and you also askquestion about personal life of the employee family etc.

someshets
07-07-2014, 07:11 AM
Knowing as much as possible about the company's past performance and future plans can make your interview more interactive and could be just the leg up you need in a competitive job market.

BossmanRex
07-07-2014, 08:31 AM
I think one of the most important things is to find out if they have researched the company. Most potential employees who are genuinely interested in the position will have researched the job and the company.

manya
07-09-2014, 03:12 AM
During the interview try to remain as calm as possible. Ask for clarification if you're not sure what's been asked and remember that it is perfectly acceptable to take a moment or two to frame your responses so you can be sure too fully answer the question.

someshets
07-11-2014, 07:02 AM
Honesty

The interview gives the employer the chance to get to know you. While you do want to sell yourself, answer each question with an honest response.

someshets
07-14-2014, 06:49 AM
It is very important to be on time for the interview. On time means ten to fifteen minutes early. If need be, take some time to drive to the office ahead of time so you know exactly where you are going. Know the interviewer's name and use it during the interview. If you're not sure of the name, call and ask prior to the interview. Remember to bring an extra copy of your resume and a list of references.

lmmanpower
07-15-2014, 03:24 AM
You should not ask the candidate about his/her personal stuff.You only need to conscious about the confidence of the candidate and how will he/she will be beneficial to your company.

redalert
07-21-2014, 04:17 AM
don't be impressed just say what you know in a fluent talking , think you are talking with a friend or a kid...

jesslee
07-22-2014, 12:04 AM
Thank you for making this thread.I learned beneficial information about the interview here.Here I find the ways that how any one can our interview.

someshets
08-05-2014, 07:04 AM
casual and calmly we should go for the interview.

kangan
08-11-2014, 01:27 AM
It might not be that ethical but I always Google the name of the person I'm going to interview. Just to get an idea of what kind of person he/she is and also because in my field of business, having somewhat of a decent online presence is helpful.
:D

someshets
08-11-2014, 07:18 AM
prepare a brief presentation of your background;
thoughtful answers to potential interviewing questions;
well researched questions about the company; and,
develop an effective strategy to market yourself.

Resource9
08-19-2014, 03:22 AM
I agree with all the points that you have mentioned. For an efficient job interview, it is also important to be yourself. The most crucial aspect is being honest about yourself. If you have any strong positive points portray them and if you have some drawbacks, specify them as well. After all, no one is perfect!

Suhanika
08-28-2014, 01:07 AM
Gathering background information on employers is a crucial element in successful interview preparation. You will need to be prepared to answer the questions "What do your know about our company"? and "Why do you want to work here?"

papu
08-28-2014, 01:40 AM
You should go through the basics like finding out about the education and previous work experience. As much as possible, however, I make sure that I focus on the candidate and have a discussion instead of an interview

MahaKarthi
09-19-2014, 05:29 AM
Go for a change from the routine interview questions. Give them real scenarios that they would have to face at work apart from testing the basic skills required. Check for readiness to come up with solutions and analyze things. And yeah, the social presence is a nice tough. Like the question!

Jschultz
09-24-2014, 02:34 PM
I like to throw in an odd ball question as well. Try to catch them off guard. For recent grad's from college I like to ask them what their first "new car" will be. Choice of new car can say a lot about a person.

gadgetprophonerepair
09-29-2014, 10:20 PM
We did some research online and printed out a list of common questions for the interview and kinda go from there.

paulclinton
05-05-2016, 07:57 AM
I would also look and try to sense the employees eyes, gestures, and expressions, and use your instinct to judge whether the person is telling the truth. Too much blinking is often a sign of deceit or lies

saharali
07-11-2016, 09:40 AM
http://upx100.com/img/1460319167.jpg ("http://upx100.com/1460319167.html)
I never interview in a structured way. Of course, you will go through the basics like finding out about the education and previous work experience. As much as possible, however, I make sure that I focus on the candidate and have a discussion instead of an interview. I treat it as a conversation, the same way that I would converse with someone that I care for. This way, I get to know more about the candidate and if he or she is suitable for the role. I also make sure that I have a friendly relationship with candidates. If they don't get shortlisted, I tell them honestly and give them improvement points.

sharansingh
07-12-2016, 03:57 PM
Ask for their past experience if they have. tell them to tackle a problem. Ask them to how they can handle a situation as a responsible employees??

Amylia
07-14-2016, 11:18 PM
I never use certifications to filter potential employees, yet I do think a few organisations may look for these as proof that you know what you are doing. Personally, I want the job candidate to show me, what they can do. The more experience you have, the more you can you demonstrate your capabilities

bhawnaa660
02-17-2017, 12:50 PM
the basics and education, experiences all are already in resume so basic can ask first and also about previous job experiences but should not that already mentioned in resume.
check the qualities in persons that requires for job.

TheDogLine
12-04-2017, 12:41 AM
Start with small talk and ask several easy questions until the candidate seems relaxed. Then, hold a behavioral interview. A behavioral interview is the best tool you have to identify candidates who have the behavioral traits and characteristics that you have selected as necessary for success in a particular job.

Zkivanova
12-09-2017, 06:20 AM
Do you ask only about the interview questions or for the whole process of hiring an employee?
I have few steps I follow, I hope it will help you:
1. Post an ad online (If you have your own website, you should post there as well on FB page, etc.)
2. Have a short phone calls with the candidates who have preferred qualifications and experience
3. First interview - I am not a fan of questions like “Why did you quit your old job”, “What did you like/dislike about your old job?”. I prefer to give them scenarios and see what their responses are.
4. Check their social media platforms (You can learn a lot from it)
5. Second interview with the short listed candidates - tell them more about the job, their responsibilities and learn what salary they are looking for.
6. Background check - I never skip this step as I believe it’s one of the most important steps. I also don’t use free website because I don’t trust them. I can recommend background-intel.com as legit and accurate.

I created this list with years experience and I found it is the most successful for me. Of course if it is for less important job, I could skip one or two steps but basically that’s it.

jr88atzbach
01-25-2018, 03:16 AM
I read up on several sites on the internet from both perspectives. The first perspective being the interviewer, and the second perspective being the interviewee.

andy8169
02-12-2018, 04:10 AM
Never pick a candidate who does not understand what morals are because the company will pay the price eventually. For male candidate, pick a candidate who understands the role of the job position.

ebudoffmd
03-09-2018, 03:55 AM
This is to ensure that both of your time are not wasted; you would not want to invite somebody for interviews only to find out that he requires sponsorship, etc.

AvaNoAh7
09-07-2018, 12:43 AM
Hi Everyone...............!
During the job interview, help the candidate demonstrate his or her knowledge, skills, and experience. Start with small talk and ask several easy questions until the candidate seems relaxed.
Thanks...............

deanwinchester1
09-13-2018, 12:25 AM
Research the industry and company. ...
Clarify your "selling points" and the reasons you want the job. ...
Anticipate the interviewer's concerns and reservations. ...
Prepare for common interview questions. ...
Line up your questions for the interviewer. ...
Practice, practice, practice.

deanwinchester1
09-24-2018, 11:42 PM
Research the industry and company. ...
Clarify your "selling points" and the reasons you want the job. ...
Anticipate the interviewer's concerns and reservations. ...
Prepare for common interview questions. ...
Line up your questions for the interviewer.