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Crowbar
09-15-2016, 09:02 PM
Hi, all.

New to the forum - owner of a small CPA practice (me and one employee) and been in business around a dozen years. Had some hits and misses with employees, but my most recent employee was a home run - worked for me for several years and was great. Had an awesome attitude, wanted to work, and clients loved her. Unfortunately for me, she had to leave recently due to family issues (nothing bad, and she gave over a month of notice). Tried online services for getting resumes, and was only able to get two interviews out of them (we contacted at least five others but none got back to us). Wanted to get someone in while she was still working so she could give them a little bit of training. Decided to hire the second person that I interviewed (had a nice personality and experience with the software that we use). She trained with her predecessor, who informed me privately that she felt that she's a good hire and will work out well.

However, after the second day that she trained, as I was getting ready to leave (had to leave early to pick up the kids), she asked me if I could be "flexible" with the pay (I had told her the pay rate before). Needless to say, I was a bit annoyed and told her that we could talk about it when she came in for her first day (which was after the following week). I didn't have time to talk about it then. She did mention it at the end of her first day, and I told her that we would revisit toward the end of the year.

This has been her first week, and I've realized that I really don't like her all that much. With prior employees, we'd small talk and have an easy rapport (I still keep in touch with a few of them, plus the one that just left). With this one (and I realize that it hasn't even been a week), I don't want to talk to her any more than I need to. I know that she wants to do well and she is trying, but I just can't feel it with her. I realize that I'm probably not being fair, but I have a feeling that this won't change. I'm to the point that I wish that I hadn't hired her and just want her to leave. I'm not nearly as friendly with her as I've been with her predecessors. I almost dread coming in to see her at work (never felt remotely that way before).

Anybody been in this situation? Remember that this is a two person business, so it's much easier if I like the person. I hate myself for saying this, but I'm thinking up ways to make her job difficult so that she'll leave (yes, this is the cowards way out, which is why I hate myself for feeling this way). I realize that part of the issue is probably about the pay question, but I really don't like her personality all that much (she's not mean, bitter, drama, or anything like that - just find her annoying for some reason).

pathrunner
09-24-2016, 09:34 PM
The truth is, alot of your negativity is probably chalked up to the money issue. Not so much because she is looking for more money that she is getting, but because you, as the employer, set the terms prior to her hire, and she agreed, only to seem to take issue with it after.

I've had this situation in the past. I had a new marketing assistant that I needed to hire. The two I had were overloaded and after three years, the strain was to the point that I new I needed to bite the bullet. The money came directly out of my pocket as the owner, so I helped my other two as much as I could, but I saw that if I didn't get them some much needed help, I risked losing one, or both of them.

So, I went through the standard drama of putting an ad up for a new marketing assistant. I had my two assistants going through resume' after resume' with me, they helped me choose, and ultimately agreed to our final choice. Now, mind you, I had the pay in both the classified and went over it in the interview as well. The terms were agreed to and were a part of their employment agreement with their job responsibilities. So you would think I had everything covered.

But obviously, as you already know, that wasn't the case. Somehow, he learned what the employees who were there three years prior to him were making and decided that he would bring up to me within his second week when he could expect a raise. Like you, I was irritated and really had to identify why. With my clients, once we negotiated a contract, that was the end of it. Unless they asked me for more work, you can bet I didn't ask them for more money. Yes, my employees who put in more work made more than him. So what? I'm not a quiet person, but I have the where with all to know when I need to get out of a situation to avoid a potential legal or moral issue. I feigned being too busy and having to rush out of the office, hopped in my car and headed home early for the day.

The next day, as usual, I was in the office before anyone else and had one thing on my mind. This kid. So, instead of saying anything directly to him, I emailed him. I wanted it in plain black and white for him and to be able to avoid any kind of ackward scene that this new fish, who was taking food out of my mouth,couldn't disrupt the rest of the fish tank.

I explained to him that his salary was clearly laid out prior to his even applying for the position, and that those who had been there longer had received periodic raises over time as their performance improved. I made it very clear that he signed his contract knowing exactly what his salary was, and that we would revisit the issue after he had 12 months with the company. I stated that if he had a change that now required more pay that had transpired from the time he saw the ad, signed the contract, and spoke with me, that I would hold no ill against him if he felt the need to resign his position and seek employment elsewhere.

That was the last I heard of it, and three months later, he no call no showed, and nobody missed him, especially not my assitants.

Hope this helps.

Crowbar
10-05-2016, 10:44 AM
Thanks for your feedback - your first sentence seems spot on. She's been here almost a month, and I still really don't like her all that much - no small talk, all business. She is trying and wants to do well, but if she were to quit, I wouldn't be upset. My fervent hope is that the predecessor contacts me to say that she's ready to go back to work (told her before she left to let me know if/when she's ready to work again, as I'd bring her back yesterday). I've even told her husband (who's come in twice to pick up checks for her) that I miss her here - don't think it will happen (she has a lot on her plate at home now) but hope springs eternal. If not, at least run another ad and try again before our busy season begins - hopefully get more replies and do a better job of picking someone.

I also agree with the body of what you wrote - like you, I gave the predecessor more based on performance (plus gave her a couple nice bonuses during the year). She proved to me that she could do the job, and kept a lot off of my plate. With this one, I have to explain things to her all of the time (and some of this is my fault - I violated my rule of having at least four interviews because we weren't getting any replies and I wanted the new person to train with the predecessor). I'm contemplating having a sit-down with her toward the end of the month going over how much time she can spend on each client and basing it on the time her predecessor spent - maybe she'll see the light and leave (had this happen about five years ago - had the sit-down with the employee who I wanted to leave, and a week later she told me she was leaving).

neel143890
11-14-2016, 01:18 AM
hello,
if you hire some one so just create a bond and say if you work with so approx 1 year service you give our business.

speeduser
01-10-2019, 12:24 AM
It's good to have an employee you can easily talk to, especially with regards to the trust and respect aspect of the job. You can make her understand that prior to taking the job, her pay rate has already been laid out to her. There's no reason for her to be bitter about it. - Paul Savramis (http://oceans2003.org/paul-savramis/)

HarbalRock
01-30-2019, 03:20 AM
As your new worker established an awful first connection—or more regrettable, outrightly ... caused the harsh begin and how you can stop any issues from the beginning.

HarbalRock
01-30-2019, 03:26 AM
As your new worker established an awful first connection—or more regrettable, outrightly ... caused the harsh begin and how you can stop any issues from the beginning.

melanie12345
02-06-2019, 03:28 AM
Better to be straightforward and open the issue to the person. Have a small talk with him/her for you to understand each other. https://melanieguardacasa.wixsite.com/insurance

emmablow
02-10-2019, 10:49 PM
Has your new representative established a terrible first connection—or more awful, conspicuously ... caused the harsh begin and how you can halt any issues from the beginning.

emmablow
02-10-2019, 10:50 PM
Has your new representative established a terrible first connection—or more awful, conspicuously ... caused the harsh begin and how you can halt any issues from the beginning.

fanean
02-12-2019, 09:27 PM
Have you provided this new employee with a new hire orientation in order to be employee are affair to comfort employees regarding performance issues. In hire we were coached to look at ant new employee for the team work productivity issues that then the lead to performance issues. In fact paced work environment on boarding new hires effectively administrative work confusion, and compliance problems down the road.

joesimen
02-14-2019, 12:54 AM
they take much advantages of new app developers

emmablow
02-19-2019, 10:35 PM
Business is a connection between two gatherings, generally dependent on an agreement where work is paid for, where one gathering, which might be an enterprise, for benefit, not-revenue driven association, co-agent or other substance is the business and the other is the worker

Rohi12
02-19-2019, 10:48 PM
Has your new worker established a terrible first connection—or more regrettable, conspicuously ... caused the harsh begin and how you can check any issues from developing in any way.