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View Full Version : What if your boss owes you a month's wage?



pandandesign
02-12-2014, 01:17 AM
It doesn't happen often that you work for a company but your boss hasn't paid you for a month. I have heard a few situation like this, but sometimes the boss pays their employees back the following month. However, sometimes the boss just doesn't pay you at all. In case, what would you do? Will you file a legal action or talk to the attorney about this? Or do you just quite the job? Please share to your thought and I want to hear what you guys have to say about this.

Jordan989
02-12-2014, 03:40 PM
I would not tolerate this from an employer. Before you start working, you should have an agreement about when and how you will be paid. If your boss doesn't pay you when they are supposed to, I wouldn't formally quit, but I would not continue to work until I was paid. I would also file a claim through small claims court. The judge would likely side with the employee and order the employer to pay you what you're owed plus the court fees.

Rainman
02-12-2014, 11:07 PM
In the UK they've got employment tribunals that deal with such disputes when employers fail to pay their workers. It works faster than having the court handle intervene. Anyway, point is, if you've worked for one month, you deserve to get paid for your work. That means quitting is not option. You get your money first [even if it means taking legal action to force your boss to pay] then quit. . .

KNH
02-13-2014, 01:39 AM
I would not tolerate this from an employer. Before you start working, you should have an agreement about when and how you will be paid. If your boss doesn't pay you when they are supposed to, I wouldn't formally quit, but I would not continue to work until I was paid. I would also file a claim through small claims court. The judge would likely side with the employee and order the employer to pay you what you're owed plus the court fees.

Absolutely. I would not tolerate this either and I would take action. That is unfair and illegal for them to not pay you.

Spiff
02-13-2014, 02:06 AM
It really depends on how much money that they haven't paid you. Most of the time, if it's not a substantial amount of money, you should probably just leave it. The attorney fees may greatly outweigh the amount you would make by actually receiving the unpaid wages. You have to do your research. Which one is going to cost more? Do you have the time and/or the money to take action against the employer? I know that it isn't fair but I am sorry to say that this thing happens more then you think and a lot of times they get away with it. Your best bet would be to send a threatening letter to the employer with the statute code on it with your name, telling them that this is illegal and that you will go after them if they don't send you the wages. My brother sent a letter like that and was finally paid the money that he had earned fair and square but his employer refused to pay him. Either way, good luck!

fredkawig
02-13-2014, 08:16 AM
You should consult your employer first. After that file a complaint within the company you work with. If that does not help try your local Labor and Employment agency and file a complaint. If it still doesn't work or you are not satisfied then better file a case in court. Though if your salary is lower than lawyer's fees better not do it.

pandandesign
02-16-2014, 02:15 AM
You should consult your employer first. After that file a complaint within the company you work with. If that does not help try your local Labor and Employment agency and file a complaint. If it still doesn't work or you are not satisfied then better file a case in court. Though if your salary is lower than lawyer's fees better not do it.

Oh, I see. I think it is better not to hire a lawyer because if the employer will pay back then it is good. Otherwise, contacting the Labor and Employment Agency will be a good idea. I think if the employer knows that they are owing their employees money, then why they hire too many employees in the first place.

mikelouis
02-16-2014, 03:19 AM
I cannot work for free because I need the money to take care of other important responsibilities. One month of no pay is the most a person should tolerate after that the employer has to won up with no more excuses.

CSomm
02-16-2014, 12:34 PM
Unless you are supposed to be making quite a hefty sum, I'd keep the lawyers out of it. They'll soak up every penny. Small claims courts deal with this situation regularly, and are an effective way to resolve these issues. Obviously, talking to your employer first would be the easiest way to fix this problem, but after it's fixed, I'd quit anyways. This does not sound like a steady line of work.

Taru
02-18-2014, 09:04 PM
This has happened to me before, but admittedly it was just when I was starting out and my wage wasn't that big yet so I was able to shrug it off, also partly because I actually liked my employer back then. I stayed because I was promised to be paid at a certain date in the future and I trusted her enough to follow through, and she did. I think a bit of subjectivity comes into play when situations like these arise, and it really just has to do with the particular aspects of each circumstance, but if the relationship is purely a financial one and you derive no other benefits from working there like actual enjoyment in the job, then it would be best to leave since there is no other driving force to rely on.

mameeker@cuse
02-20-2014, 12:50 AM
I would go right up to the boss and demand my owed wage. If refused I would threaten legal action and wait a few days. After the few days passed I would talk to an attorney and see what legal actions I could pursue, but only if the owed wage was worth losing the job.

alec
02-20-2014, 02:15 AM
What you do depends on the company you work at and the country you live in. For bigger companies you go up the chain of leadership and find someone to get your problem worked. For smaller companies, talk with the boss and try to resolve the situation then take legal action. Now, why did I say it depends on the country? There are some countries where if the company is state owned you're pretty much guaranteed to just have to wait until the situation is resolved and pay is received. No legal action options and sometimes you'll be payed in products manufactured where you work instead of cash.

gadgetised
02-20-2014, 03:41 AM
Don't bother with lawyers unless it is a large sum of money. Going to court can cost you more in the long run, both emotionally and financially.

delusional
02-20-2014, 11:35 AM
Never try to sue for a month's salary. You'll lose more money than you will ever make and it will ruin your standing with your boss.
Just ask him and if he doesn't want to pay, leave the company as soon as possible because it will not be the last time this will happen.

Lostvalleyguy
02-28-2014, 08:24 PM
If you are to be paid biweekly, monthly or whatever, then you should receive your payment at the correct time. Talk to your employer first - payroll mistakes can happen and they should be able to correct the situation quickly. If not, and you have any reason to believe that the employer cant or wont pay you - quitting is probably a good idea. Better to be spending your time looking for a new job than working for free.
You have a mortgage, rent, car payments ... to make and on time. Your landlord isn't going to waive your rent because you didn't get paid. Let the employer know that any late fees and interest charges incurred as a result of non-payment will be added to your lawsuit should you have to take it that far.
If you work a contract job in which you are paid when the company gets paid for the contract, they may be right in not paying an employee on a given date.

crucider
02-28-2014, 08:37 PM
Talk with your employer would probably be the best bet before attempting to take anything to court. If you do you'll end up wasting a lot of money when you two can probably just work it out. Plus you might be able to get something in the end that'll benefit you like some more vacation time. Good luck!

cpefley
02-28-2014, 11:44 PM
A long time ago, I worked at Blockbuster, and I worked there for almost a month without pay. They said that there was a mixup with payroll, but I quit anyway after I missed 2 full paychecks and had to fight for them after I left. I finally got them, but it was frustrating.

autograph
03-01-2014, 11:21 AM
First of all, you should talk about this with your employer first. Find out if any mistakes occurred on their side that caused your salary was not paid on time. If it was honest mistake, you should get the issue rectified almost immediately. If your employer appear to be dodging the responsibility, you should take the legal route and be prepared to move on to a new job. At least in my state, not paying your worker is extremely illegal and the business would get into a big problem if the case reaches the court.

janineaa
03-07-2014, 09:47 AM
For me, it depends on the amount of money they owe. But I wouldn't necessarily tolerate this action from an employer. Before contract-signing for a job, it is usually stated as to when and how much you will be paid that both parties must agree on. If your employer does not pay you on time, ask first what's happening and if there is no answer, stop working for a while until they pay you.

soopersonic
03-07-2014, 02:16 PM
You really don't need to get a lawyer here, you should try to get your back wages without it costing you money. The way to do this is to approach your local labour agency - whether that's at a municipal or state level, you can file a complaint with the agency that manages complaints against the labour standards act. If you let us know your location, I can be a bit more specific about where you need to go... ...

cpefley
03-07-2014, 07:06 PM
Hopefully the labor board can help. I definitely would try routes that don't involve hiring a lawyer, but as a last resort. Although, that might be the only option that will get your anywhere.

caparica007
03-19-2014, 04:27 AM
Unfortunately most of us have been through this situation where the pay doesn't come in the due day and in my opinion it's really tricky. You can wait a for a couple of days to see if the payment arrives, that's probably the best option if you don't want to have any issues, but if the situation is recurrent and the relation with your boss is not the best, nothing like going to the labor board. Lawyers will come later or never I hope!

donnawhite
07-31-2014, 03:32 AM
You should directly contact to your boss and Hr. if not get satisfied solution, should ask to the mediators to solve out this workplace issue. You will be completely assist by them. No need to visit court, you will not get anything their either will get another date or will get not a satisfied solution.
Save your other expenses of court and precious time.