PDA

View Full Version : How often do you accept late customers?



pandandesign
02-16-2014, 05:42 PM
I personally don't accept late customers because when my dad's business is ready to close, then he has to close for the night. I don't get the reason people would come in 5 to 10 minutes before we close and stay as long as they want, and there are a few times we actually have to tell them it is already passed the closing time. What about you? How often do you accept late customers?

Rainman
02-18-2014, 05:09 AM
You should be strict in enforcing your closing hours. Customers need to know that besides running a business you have other important things to do - like spending time with your family, taking some rest, etc. When I worked in a store years back when I was young, we never accepted late customers. Since it was a small town, everyone got to know that if you came late, you wouldn't be buy stuff.

fredkawig
02-18-2014, 08:58 AM
We seldom accept late customers, usually when we're closing or when it's closing time we tell the customers to go to other stalls since we are already closing. Sometimes, it's really annoying for people to come in at about 12 in the evening where in people are tired and are ready to go home which happens to us always.

caveman
02-19-2014, 11:13 AM
If i'm not not too tired, I always welcome late customers, especially regular customers. Usually I attend their needs because, well, profit :) But some days when i'm extremely tired I do shut the doors.

owesem75
02-19-2014, 03:07 PM
It is always good to maintain excellent customer relationship with your client and I think it is ok to extend a little more time for them to show appreciation for trusting and doing business with you. I don't think it happens all the time specially when you have properly set the operational and business hours. Check if the customer really needs it and can't wait for the next business day believe me, it will do more good to you when you can accommodate them during the time they need your services the most. Otherwise, if it is not urgent and he is a loyal customer, then he will understand that you are now closing and will just come back the next day.

Taru
02-20-2014, 01:07 AM
I get some late night texts often regarding inquiries for my sales items, and usually, I just respond to them the next morning. The only exceptions I'd give out would be if the potential buyer stated that it were to be gifted for an upcoming special occasion. Otherwise, I choose to respect the rules I have put up just to be fair to everyone, including myself. The only downside to this is that I'm guessing I've missed a good number of sales from abiding by my own rules, but it is by choice that I prioritize my rules over profits which isn't the same for every business owner.

alec
02-20-2014, 03:52 AM
Depends. We're living in a small town where business is slow thus any customer is a welcomed sight. Being a family business we afford to put in extra time but I imagine that as an employee at a normal job I'd be more inclined to enforce strict closing hours. Plus, small town, word gets out fast so we really have to put that extra effort in and provide quality while showing we're dependable and helpful.

A business based on sales (car dealer, homes) I imagine it's one of those places where late customers are always welcome. When you're payed by commission, and that commission is high, you're more inclined to put in extra time.

autograph
02-21-2014, 06:49 AM
If the customer is late not more than 30 minutes, I will let it slide. Although I shall make it clear that I would not wait that long for our next meeting. I realize that if we are punctual, more often than not, the customer will mirror our habit when doing business with us. It has become a part of our unwritten rules to always be on time for business meeting. If a customer is late repeatedly, he/she will make it to the bottom of my priority list.

CSomm
02-27-2014, 01:02 PM
I think it's important to be clear about the type of business we are referring to. For the restaurant industries, a server can still make good money after the doors close by taking care of straggling customers while the kitchen closes down and everyone goes about the end-of-day work. For anything that incurs no additional sales, I'd say NO to them right off the bat. My business no longer makes money through your presence, and in fact I'm losing money by having to pay people to stick around! It's relative to the way that you make your money.

KNH
02-27-2014, 07:13 PM
I think it's important to be clear about the type of business we are referring to. For the restaurant industries, a server can still make good money after the doors close by taking care of straggling customers while the kitchen closes down and everyone goes about the end-of-day work. For anything that incurs no additional sales, I'd say NO to them right off the bat. My business no longer makes money through your presence, and in fact I'm losing money by having to pay people to stick around! It's relative to the way that you make your money.

Exactly. It depends what you're selling. Late customers can be really annoying. A friend of mine would close her shop at 7:45 even though her employees got paid until 8 just in case a late customer came in.

eppie
02-28-2014, 05:52 AM
I personally don't accept late customers because when my dad's business is ready to close, then he has to close for the night. I don't get the reason people would come in 5 to 10 minutes before we close and stay as long as they want, and there are a few times we actually have to tell them it is already passed the closing time. What about you? How often do you accept late customers?

I agree with CSomm :) it depends on the type of business.

Like in my case, I offer web/blog design and set up services so I always make it a point to explain to clients when will I be able to finish a certain project. If a client wants me to finish a project in 3 days when in reality I can only deliver in 5 days then I will not accept it because I know the quality of my work will suffer. It's a different scenario but this is what a "late customer" is for me.

Taru
03-04-2014, 05:09 AM
Depends. We're living in a small town where business is slow thus any customer is a welcomed sight. Being a family business we afford to put in extra time but I imagine that as an employee at a normal job I'd be more inclined to enforce strict closing hours. Plus, small town, word gets out fast so we really have to put that extra effort in and provide quality while showing we're dependable and helpful.

A business based on sales (car dealer, homes) I imagine it's one of those places where late customers are always welcome. When you're payed by commission, and that commission is high, you're more inclined to put in extra time.

Good point. I think it really just is a matter of how you weigh the difference between the effort and the potential profit to be gained from accepting said customer/s. If the potential payment is high for just one transaction, then I imagine it would be a whole lot more tempting to bend the rules, especially if there are no further requirements such as having to fire up the kitchen again and bring out all the ingredients, such as the situation that you stated in your example wherein a car dealer will most likely just need to talk to the customer and not much more effort was needed further than that.

yoshika
10-29-2020, 02:12 AM
It's very Frustrating but we try not to take a combative tone toward the customer! Keep running your business as usual. If you can't find a specific Car it's worth checking Autoankauf Düsseldorf! Buying and selling a car online in your own city is now easier than you think. Autoankauf Düsseldorf offers you unbeatable prices, we're so sure you won't find better prices! https://tinyurl.com/y3oyswfy

Nags
11-05-2020, 12:46 AM
Depends. We're living in a small town where business is slow thus any customer is a welcomed sight. Being a family business we afford to put in extra time but I imagine that as an employee at a normal job I'd be more inclined to enforce strict closing hours. Plus, small town, word gets out fast so we really have to put that extra effort in and provide quality while showing we're dependable and helpful.

TangelThor
11-05-2020, 01:29 AM
That said, one party cannot arbitrarily decide to change the terms of a contract. Any amendment is considered by law to be a contract and needs to be agreed by both parties. If one of them does not agree to the changes, then they will not be enforceable.