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View Full Version : Have you ever received interview training?



delusional
02-17-2014, 04:54 AM
I had a course at business school that taught you how to handle interview questions, prepare, what questions to expect and how to write your resume.

It really helped to know how to handle certain situations and what questions to expect.

Do you guys think it's useful to have this kind of training? Would you ever pay for it?

CSomm
02-17-2014, 01:30 PM
I think most of this sort of interview training is readily available for free on the internet. Sites like EHow and About.com are pretty comprehensive on this topic, and I think they have great advice for potential employees.

That being said, I think a specialized course that has proven effectiveness is a marketable concept. EHow and About.com can't specifically boast about their success rate through their articles, but you could.

Bakerpat
02-17-2014, 01:58 PM
I was actually looking some sort of training that was teaching effective skills to have when trying to sale yourself. I can not really remember the name of the course but it was a good review. Although we have had this training at one time or another it is always good to have reviews.

Sales people get to do role playing when learning their scripts for the product they are marketing, it does work but giving you something to think about instead of winging it and saying the wrong thing at the wrong time.

Taru
02-17-2014, 09:59 PM
I did receive some lessons from university, yes, but I wouldn't necessarily pay for it exclusively had I not, especially nowadays when all information I'd need is online. I wouldn't exactly say it helped much anyway, since I learned much more just from actually going into interviews and experiencing it myself than what they taught in class which was all just hypothetical and not really that accurate. Although, I'd still consider it as being somewhat helpful, still, but I just wouldn't have paid to get the training.

Rainman
02-18-2014, 06:27 AM
I've never received interview training. In fact, I've never had to be interviewed for a job because sometimes the people work for are only interested in how creative you are. All you need to do is send a sample of your artistic work and based on their evaluation of your level of skill you either get hired or get a "no thank you" letter in the mail.

If I were to be interviewed for a job, still I wouldn't take any training for interviews. It's safer that way. Someone may instinctively hate you. . .and no matter how well you've trained for your interview, you'd still not get hired.

autograph
02-18-2014, 09:24 AM
I have never received such training before. My universities do provide a mock interview training FOC. I definitely think this will yield a good advantage for someone who has never attended an interview before. I would not go as far as paying for such training though; I typically rehearse with a few general interview questions and a few unusual questions. This has helped me landing on a few jobs so far.

fredkawig
02-18-2014, 10:03 AM
I personally wouldn't. But I know some people who go through this kinds of classes or forums which costs money, not much but still it isn't free. I am a very competent person especially when it comes to interviews, speaking, talking with much fluency. I guess I'm prepared for whatever job interview I might go into and I am also confident that I would be accepted and highly recommended.

SmartPea85
02-18-2014, 01:40 PM
I think this kind of training is really important, especially for people with not much interview/professional job experience. Before we graduated my professors set up mock-interviews in which we got to present ourselves in an interview setting and get constructive criticism to help us make the most of first impressions, sharing vital information and boosting our confidence. This was really helpful because I find I get nervous during interviews, even if I am confident I could do the job, and sometimes I get stumped on what I want to say. Some people are naturally good interviewers, but if the only time you think about it is in the moment of the interview, it's already too late. Just like anything, practice makes perfect. Courses that include tips, ideas and practice sessions should be part of every college program.

alec
02-18-2014, 04:38 PM
Sadly no, and like most here I've come to see just how important it is. At the university I attended we didn't have any specialized courses in business but we did learn how to write request letters, resignation letters and the lot. Nowadays I just use online resources and learn what I can: interview etiquette, frequently asked questions and how to handle them, what to wear (this one's silly but still), how to talk.

Luckily, my sister works in HR and we had some interesting talks about job interviews but from the perspective of the interviewer. Lots of useful stuff that's hard to get since most information on the topic is written from the perspective of the future employee.

DonnaIReilly
02-18-2014, 05:14 PM
No, I have never received interview training but I have thought about doing it though in the past. Then I change my mind because every job I have ever applied for I have always got, so I mustn't be that bad at interviews. I find if I research what the company is about, then prepare before the day, I am always okay with interviews. I find I am lucky this way :D

DomDom
02-18-2014, 07:03 PM
I have never had any kind of education for it but I would love to hear some of the useful tidbits you have been taught!

basmae
02-19-2014, 04:35 AM
I think it would be useful if you are not feeling too confident with it. But if you have had a lot of experience wither given or attending interviews, you should already know everything.

mameeker@cuse
02-19-2014, 04:32 PM
I know at the Whitman School of Management currently every graduate will have had at least one class in interviewing and resume writing. Personally I am going to take all three classes offered in this subject matter, due to the ability to communicate with an interviewer properly and respectfully being an essential part of getting a great job. I would also be willing to pay money in addition to my tuition to attend resume and interviewing seminars. In this modern age of everyone having college degrees it is very important in my oppinion to make yourself stand out from the masses.

stacyje
02-19-2014, 04:47 PM
I took a business management class on line and earn my associate degree and I learned alot about interview questions. We actually had to answer some questions and write a paper on good interview question and what employers look for when you enter into an interview setting. such as posture, appearances, handshakes, and most important of all being on time and a firm hand shake.

MrLuke
02-21-2014, 12:24 PM
Yes- a few times at school, we had people come in to do mock interviews- they were very useful. It got me into my little part time job at a newsagents, and hopefully will help me later on, as I have experience. And people may think it's only a little job, or it was only a bit of experience, but it really did help, and hopefully will get me into that top spot. A technique they did teach me after the interview is just to go out and talk to people you don't know. Quite simple really. You could go all fancy and get lessons (yes, they exist). It would be a bit like learning to drive, just without the...driving. Any preparations you can make to perfect an interview are worth it.

sofieb529
02-21-2014, 03:10 PM
If you take ' Business' or ' Business Marketing', interview training is part of the program. Other wise here in Canada, you can get Small Business support from the government and they give you assistance in writing questions and tips on what things to look for in a potential employee.

chelleeann
02-21-2014, 03:23 PM
I had a course at business school that taught you how to handle interview questions, prepare, what questions to expect and how to write your resume.

It really helped to know how to handle certain situations and what questions to expect.

Do you guys think it's useful to have this kind of training? Would you ever pay for it?

I think that this type of training is extremely useful. Employers usually base their opinion of who they think the employee is by how they act and prepare for an interview, on how they answer interview questions and on how well their resume is written. I think that classes that teach people how to do these things would prepare them for successfully acquiring gainful employment and would better prepare them to succeed in their every day activities at work. It's possible that such a class would also give them a motivation to reach their (or their employers) professional goals. I think that workforce assistance companies should think about providing for this service free of charge. The idea of paying for it doesn't really make sense to me since most of the individuals who would benefit from this type of program would be individuals who have had, or who have a hard time finding long-term employment, and let's be honest, how much sense does it make to charge people who don't have money for a service that claims to help them to attain employment so that they can have money?

justSaying
02-22-2014, 01:16 AM
Yes it would work. However, from experience, the best learning aid is actual interviews. After attending and completing an interview, always ask the panel how you fared and what they think you should improve on. The response you get is very useful and coming from an actual employer, it will mean a lot in your preparation for other interviews. Well that is of course if you don't get that very job. ;)

DomDom
02-22-2014, 07:32 PM
Yes it would work. However, from experience, the best learning aid is actual interviews. After attending and completing an interview, always ask the panel how you fared and what they think you should improve on. The response you get is very useful and coming from an actual employer, it will mean a lot in your preparation for other interviews. Well that is of course if you don't get that very job. ;)

Asking questions like this might actually be the reason you get it. I would always love to take somebody who thinks about getting better.

wander_n_wonder
03-14-2014, 12:58 AM
Honestly, I don't believe in training for an interview. I would say interviews should be natural and it's not something that must be scripted or dictated by another person. If you tend to sugarcoat or put your best foot forward all the time, it may also not be a good measure of what you can actually do in the company. A good level of honesty and transparency is really important in any interview.

lizzief79
03-22-2014, 12:23 PM
In the UK Year 10 and 11 students do a mock interview as preparation for working life. When I was working for the Youth and COmmunity Service on a casual contract and a permanent position came up, my line manager sat and did practise interviews with me. This was because I had very little interview experience at the time and I was really nervous. It really helped and I got the job.

difrancprod
03-23-2014, 07:10 AM
I have not experienced such trainings. But I think it does help. But I also think that it's really simple when all you can do really during an interview is be yourself and not try too hard to impress the interviewer.

DomDom
03-23-2014, 03:57 PM
In the UK Year 10 and 11 students do a mock interview as preparation for working life. When I was working for the Youth and COmmunity Service on a casual contract and a permanent position came up, my line manager sat and did practise interviews with me. This was because I had very little interview experience at the time and I was really nervous. It really helped and I got the job.

Teaching students how to interview good is a smart thing to educate young people!

ursell
03-26-2014, 07:24 PM
No I didn't received interview training. But I wish I would have taken training. In today's day and age when you have an
interview some times you have to come back for a second one and you can be interviewed by more than one person at
a time things change a lot.

gHiros
03-27-2014, 02:24 AM
Like many of you, I never had the opportunity to get trained for an interview. For me, my first interview was facing the "firing squad" cold turkey! No training at all, just dove in. My only training in such an environment would be a Speech course I took as a freshman in the university. But today's university or college maybe different. In fact, in my neck of the woods, we have career days and job fairs that not only provide job opportunities for job seekers, but free resume writing sessions as well as mock interviews. I guess time has changed!

wandering wildman
03-27-2014, 03:07 AM
I think interviewing, job hunting, maintaining your credit, and many other valuable life-lesson course would be a much bigger benefit than taking some of the more standard educations classes that we subject our students too. The coaching also has to be realistic. It has to teach people to be themselves during the interview. I read too many articles that suggest creating a positive spin on everything is the answer. I think the answer is always to be yourself.