PDA

View Full Version : Walking around the Issue?



spc97t
02-19-2014, 04:20 PM
I know several people who worked in professional jobs that, just lately, lost their jobs. The standard reason for letting them go seems to be, "We appreciate all you've done for the company, but we've grown apart." Of course, a bit of severance pay follows the generic goodbye if the employee agrees to sign a form to not sue. Does this reasoning not circumvent the whole point of letting someone go, particularly in a professional position?

mameeker@cuse
02-20-2014, 01:10 AM
Generally these employees are let go because they are the highest paid people. They then hire young employees and promote from the mid-levels to upper-levels. One way to look at this situation is "wow the top people are getting let go, what gives?", another way of looking at it is "wow these business sure has a lot of promotions".

CeliVega
02-20-2014, 08:10 AM
It might be because the company is trying to venture into new businesses, and the higher-ups feel that they no longer require the expertise of the stated professions. Or they think that they can train new employees to perform the tasks of the professionals at a lower cost, so might as well just eliminate the job position that is no longer needed.

caveman
02-20-2014, 08:45 AM
I think it just all depends on what the company is planning for their future. They might be down-sizing because of the cost or they want to hire new employees with different qualifications. It can be a number of reasons.

delusional
02-20-2014, 12:41 PM
I don't know what I would do in that situation. One part of me says I wouldn't want to stay if they wanted to fire me anyone. The other part says that you just can't accept the money and then they would have to pay you more.

Radium
02-21-2014, 03:09 PM
I don't think there's anything wrong with that reasoning, at the end of the day the business does what is in the best interest of the business and if that's cutting costs or hiring new talent then that is the strategy the executives will take. However firing employees like that isn't always the best decision to take particularly if their plans don't work out, for example the new employees aren't up to standard or the lack of the professionals means the productivity of the business is reduced. So taking the decision to let go long time workers is a big risk and isn't done without careful consideration normally.

sofieb529
02-21-2014, 03:28 PM
I think the word ' generic' is right on queue. Its an easy cop-out in some situations. I am sure there are other reasons for letting go of an employee and most centre around money!

chelleeann
02-21-2014, 03:45 PM
I know several people who worked in professional jobs that, just lately, lost their jobs. The standard reason for letting them go seems to be, "We appreciate all you've done for the company, but we've grown apart." Of course, a bit of severance pay follows the generic goodbye if the employee agrees to sign a form to not sue. Does this reasoning not circumvent the whole point of letting someone go, particularly in a professional position?

I don't think it does, if you really think about it, yes they may give this person severance, but in the long run, will it save the company more to let this person go, give them a severance package and hire someone younger who will do more for less pay? Or will it cost them more to keep the high-paid employee who they can't pile an extra workload on? It's the corporate way of looking at things. If you are in a high position, or in a low position even, you as an employee are always replaceable...unless you make yourself unique. Unless you're an asset to the company in such a way that they would hurt if you were gone, there will always be someone better brighter younger and willing to work more for less pay and you as the employee will always be replaceable.

jptrey06
02-23-2014, 04:51 AM
Maybe its because the company and that particular employee are having different opinion on the decision making, maybe its because they want to hire a way cheaper talent, maybe its because they are downsizing and letting go of the higher paid employees makes more sense than firing a lot of cheaper talents.

There's a lot of possible reason to this. But it will all comes down to this one question: will it be good for the business? If the answer of most people in the company that have power to this is yes, then its probably a good business move.

owesem75
02-23-2014, 08:28 AM
I think its just a standard procedure that somebody must sign a form not to sue...

But why some companies are doing this depends on their strategic position, including the strategic value of that particular employee. Companies have short-term, medium-term and long-term objectives to meet.. so an executive decision is always carried out because based on that... that's in my opinion.

Taru
02-24-2014, 11:40 PM
Companies are just like human beings, they do what is necessary to keep themselves alive and protected, so if this is the best way to achieve a company's goals then it will be done regardless of all the minor details that come with it. They do it this way to make the separation as clean as possible, and also to prevent any further discomfort for the employee who is being let go. I think companies' responsibilities only reach to that point and everything further is just a bonus, personally - they really don't owe employees much else and it is up to them and their capacity whether or not they will go the extra mile but they don't really have to, technically speaking.

ursell
03-27-2014, 06:46 PM
It doesn't matter what the reason is behind a company downsizing or whatever you want to call it. They shouldn't do it the results is still
the same that you are putting someone out of work and to make the company feel better about themselves they give you a severance check
so you won't sue them. I wouldn't take the check and I would stay even though I know that the company wanted to get rid of me.

Jane Hastings
03-30-2014, 11:08 AM
I feel bad for those people who worked for their companies for how many years and then get fired just like that. But I understand that they are just doing what they think is best for the company. Businesses grow and most of the time, they also require different people with different qualities. But I believe these people need proper goodbyes and not just "generic" goodbyes.

sweetkymom
04-04-2014, 04:40 PM
If I was unhappy in the position I was in and I was called back for a generic good-bye, I'd take it along with the severance pay and benefits. I would begin my search for a new adventure. Most companies let go of their high ups after so long so they might as well be prepared for it.

Laurenity
07-22-2014, 04:08 AM
opportunity and growth are far more important so it is easy for you to go for the next level.

Laurenity
07-26-2014, 03:20 AM
I want to say also "Work Smarter not Harder"