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chelleeann
02-21-2014, 09:57 AM
I have 12+ years of experience in Customer Service, Office Assisting, Reception and Data entry, But I have realized that I can probably utilize my abilities better if I use them as an independent contractor instead of becoming employed by a corporation. Do any of you have any idea how I would register with the government as an Independent Contractor? If so, please feel free to respond/message me.

Athenagdlyt
03-27-2014, 10:58 PM
Welcome to the volatile world of independent contracting. Each country, state, or area of governance has its own set of rules pertaining to the registration of any type of business. The classification per type of business entity would also greatly depend on that specific sector of the government wherein you reside or are legally accountable for. The best move to to is to do a thorough research on your country's rules before you approach your town's business registration department to give you an idea on what to expect with regards to your independent business registration. A trusted person who has gone through the same process in your area would be your best companion to assist you in this venture. Good luck!

fredkawig
03-28-2014, 06:46 AM
That' really depends upon your country. Here in the Philippines, you must register with DOLE which is the department of labor and employment, I guess it would be similar to your country.

printer
10-22-2014, 03:18 AM
Yes i agree it will totally depends upon your country rules and regulations.

shrinkme
10-22-2014, 09:26 PM
I do business consulting. It's very rewarding, exciting, and frightening at different times. Cash flow can be a challenge when you go from one client to another like I do... especially when you end up negotiating different payment terms with each. If you can keep more than one client at a time, that would probably work better.

As many entrepreneurs do, I have more than one business area within my business. Note that I have been full time with my business for more than 4 years and my wife has been full time with the business about 2 years. Both of us being paid from our business income can get a little tense at times.

tuantranbk
08-02-2018, 09:48 AM
That' really depends upon your country. Here in the Philippines, you must register with DOLE which is the department of labor and employment, I guess it would be similar to your country.

That's correct. You need to check & carefully follow the rule.

amayajace
10-28-2019, 02:30 AM
Choose a business name (and register it, if necessary).
Get a tax registration certificate (and a vocational license, if required for your profession).
Pay estimated taxes (advance payments of your income and self-employment taxes).

amayajace
10-28-2019, 02:31 AM
Choose a business name (and register it, if necessary).
Get a tax registration certificate (and a vocational license, if required for your profession).
Pay estimated taxes (advance payments of your income and self-employment taxes).

John G. Anai
02-04-2020, 04:47 AM
Many independent contractors start earning money without really planning on it. Before they know it, their sideline projects have become legitimate businesses -- which means that they have to fulfill some basic business start-up requirements. Whenever you provide services and get paid, you must comply with several government rules, even if you work only a few hours per week.
At a minimum, do these three things when you're first starting out as an independent contractor:

Choose a business name and register it, if necessary.
Get a tax registration certificate and a vocational license, if required for your profession.
Pay estimated taxes advance payments of your income and self-employment taxes.

Rahul28
01-23-2021, 06:35 AM
The general rule is that an individual is an independent contractor if the payer has the right to control or direct only the result of the work and not what will be done and how it will be done. The earnings of a person who is working as an independent contractor are subject to Self-Employment Tax.