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Mafdet
02-28-2014, 09:38 AM
We're recruiting for a small contact center project and we seem to have a hard time finding someone suitable for the job even though the project does not require much experience or knowledge. I was wondering if you can share from your experience significant questions that can be addressed during an interview that can give you a quick idea as to what kind of person you're dealing with.

wander_n_wonder
02-28-2014, 03:25 PM
I love asking situational questions because that will tell me a lot how a person would react in a given situation. It is also very natural, so it does not give the person a chance to give scripted answers. It is best to ask about really difficult situations and ask how that person would deal with it. You see his personality as well as his problem solving skills and how he deals with others.

CSomm
02-28-2014, 05:38 PM
You need to throw them off their game. Most people walk into an interview expecting boiler plate questions that you took off the internet (where do you see yourself in five years, etc) but those questions give you nothing but prepared responses. Do something that makes them laugh, or throws them off, and you start to get a feel for who that person really is, and what that person is capable of. If you have low requirements, you should be able to train someone with no experience as long as they communicate well with you.

ursell
02-28-2014, 11:46 PM
Ask about there previous job and why did they leave it?, Ask what can they bring to the company?, the usual questions
that is usually ask during interviews.

mikelouis
03-01-2014, 02:56 AM
Ask them questions that can make them show confidence on how to handle tasks when assigned to them. It is important to rate someone based on their ability to tackle several issues with confidence not someone who easily gives up.

danderson239
03-01-2014, 09:03 AM
I love asking situational questions because that will tell me a lot how a person would react in a given situation. It is also very natural, so it does not give the person a chance to give scripted answers. It is best to ask about really difficult situations and ask how that person would deal with it. You see his personality as well as his problem solving skills and how he deals with others.

I'll echo this. Behavioral based interview questions are the most revealing (i.e. "tell me about a time when..."). I always reverse the roles and ask "If you were making the hiring decision for this position, what qualities would you look for in a candidate that will make them successful in this role? What would make someone unsuccessful in this role?". I also like to ask "Describe the manager that will get the very best work from you.". I feel these questions really reveal what type of employee you'll get.

Taru
03-01-2014, 10:20 AM
I personally prefer just asking hypothetical questions related to the line of work we do, to see how he or she would react to certain events, and even if he or she did not know specifically what to do, I would just base my judgement on how rational the answer is because I don't really expect anyone to know everything about a certain business right out of the gate. I value analytic skills the most, and I try to see how aware the person is on how to properly react in given situations and also his or her willingness to learn.

autograph
03-01-2014, 11:05 AM
You can always start with the basic generic questions. Internet is your best source for these type of interview questions. The next part would be questions that are unique to your company only. You could ask questions to gauge their analytic skills in solving the problem. For the final part, you could always ask an open-ended question. This will generally throw them off their game and you get a better insight of how the candidate will fit in your organization.

delusional
03-01-2014, 03:43 PM
There are a lot of websites who offer basic interview questions. I always ask why someone wants to join the company. This gives a very broad view on their ideas and way of thinking. Also proves their motivation.

SimplySidy
03-02-2014, 01:20 AM
Apart from the technical and job related stuff, I also ask them about -
1. Why they Left the earlier job (or are planning to leave)
2. Why they want to join us
3. What would they do if they had a better offer after working for 2 years at a higher post with us
4. What are their goals and expectations from us in terms of Promotions, Salary Increase
5. Anything else they would like to tell us about us

Once recruited, I would recommend that we still contnue interacting with them maybe once in 2-3 months and re-evaluate them

29525500
03-02-2014, 04:57 PM
I would also say to try to have a genuine conversation with them. Try to get them to lower their defenses and open up a little about themselves. This will give them the opportunity to badmouth their former employs or show any other unwanted traits.

sdsnook
03-02-2014, 05:08 PM
Sounds to me that it is more in the advertisement of the position. If you have just a lazy dazy ad on craigslist then that's what your going to get. If you are putting it out on one of the job boards, you might have a better response. Perhaps this would be a good position to give to a contracting company so that you can get the right fit! Good luck!!

Mafdet
03-03-2014, 01:06 PM
I've attended an interview myself recently and the manager who was interviewing me impressed me so much that I really feel I've learned a lot. The interview took about 2 hours and he asked specific questions that would give him an insight into my skills and my experience. Questions that would test your logic, your willingness to rise up to expectations, to resolve problems, customer orientation and a lot more. I believe it is very important to know exactly what you're after when interviewing. To have everything prepared.

janineaa
03-05-2014, 08:38 AM
It's fun to ask situational questions or give behavioral interviews to candidates for a job. Below are basic questions that you can ask the candidate and at the same time, you will be able to know a lot about the person you may or may not hire:

Tell me about how you worked effectively under pressure.
How do you handle a challenge? Give an example.
Have you ever made a mistake? How did you handle it?
Give an example of a goal you reached and tell me how you achieved it.
Describe a decision you made that wasn't popular and how you handled implementing it.
Give an example of how you set goals and achieve them.
Give an example of how you worked on a team.
What do you do if you disagree with someone at work?
Share an example of how you were able to motivate co-workers.
Have you handled a difficult situation?

MikeLevin
03-22-2017, 05:15 AM
That really depends, on what type of projects you are running in your contact-center. You always can try to hire some freelancers that will work from home at the beginning.

Zkivanova
12-13-2017, 01:32 PM
I like to give questions of the type “What would you do if”, I believe logic and problem solving skills are more important than education or experience (Depending on the position of course). I also like to ask “What would I see if I run a background check on you today?” and then if this is my favorite candidate I would run a background check and I will compare it to the given answers. This shows me how trustworthy the person is.

daphnie_43
12-13-2017, 01:37 PM
I like to give questions of the type “What would you do if”, I believe logic and problem solving skills are more important than education or experience (Depending on the position of course). I also like to ask “What would I see if I run a background check on you today?” and then if this is my favorite candidate I would run a background check and I will compare it to the given answers. This shows me how trustworthy the person is.

Where do you run the background checks? I am a new business owner and I haven`t done background check before?

Zkivanova
12-13-2017, 01:45 PM
I use background-intel.com. It is very fast and accurate. I highly recommend it.

terryhunter
01-30-2018, 11:05 AM
I would look at making sure that you are in format with the resume (see here if you're unsure what's on a resume https://www.velvetjobs.com/resume/) but basically expand of this idea and prepare yourself some notes to run off. Without notes and some practice it could be a terrible interview which nobody wants. If there are some practical/non-practical tests that are required, ensure that all documents are given upon arrival for your examination.

Preparation is key!

emilygilbert
03-06-2018, 05:23 AM
Hi SimplySidy,
Great explanation. I totally agree with you.
These are some important questions that need to ask during an interview.
Thanks!!

KaraEKohler
03-26-2018, 07:05 AM
I adore asking situational questions since that will disclose to me a ton how a man would respond in a given circumstance. It is likewise extremely common, so it doesn't allow the individual to give scripted answers. It is best to get some information about extremely troublesome circumstances and ask how that individual would manage it. You see his identity and in addition his critical thinking aptitudes and how he manages others.

TonyANewhall
03-29-2018, 05:18 AM
I revere asking situational inquiries since that will uncover to me a ton how a man would react in a given condition. It is moreover amazingly normal, so it doesn't enable the person to give scripted answers. It is best to get some data about to a great degree troublesome conditions and ask how that individual would oversee it. You see his personality and moreover his basic reasoning aptitudes and how he oversees others.

losemymind
04-05-2018, 02:27 AM
I think usually will ask their skills levels and how is their understanding about this job

AvaNoAh7
09-07-2018, 12:45 AM
HI Everyone........!
How would you describe the responsibilities of the position?
How would you describe a typical day in this position?
Is this a new position? If not, what did the previous employee go on to do?
What is the company's management style?
Who does this position report to? If I am offered the position, can I meet him or her before making my final acceptance decision?
Why is this position available?
How many people work in this office/department?
How much travel is expected?
Is relocation a possibility?
What is the typical work week? Is overtime expected?
What are the prospects for growth and advancement?
How does one advance in the company?
Are there any examples of a career path beginning with this position?
Would you like a list of references?
If I am extended a job offer, how soon would you like me to start?
What can I clarify for you about my qualifications?
When can I expect to hear from you?
Are there any other questions I can answer for you?
Do you have any reservations about my qualifications?
Do you have a policy for helping new members of the team get on board?
What are the biggest challenges of this job?
What's the most important thing I should accomplish in the first ninety days?
How would you describe this company's values?
How has the company changed over the last few years?
What are the company's plans for growth and development?
What are the biggest rewards of the job and working for this company?
What is the best part of working for this company?
What's your least favorite part of working here?
What type of background do you feel would be best suited for success in this position?
Thanks....................

AllanHarmer
11-26-2018, 12:52 PM
This is one of the most important things before getting a job indeed.
I recommend visiting some preparation website like https://practicetestgeeks.com/best-interview-questions-answers/

Ryan Reynold
01-04-2019, 04:57 AM
We have some proven examples of good questions to ask during a job interview:
Can you tell me more about the day-to-day responsibilities of this job? ...
What do you think are the most important qualities for someone to excel in this role? ...