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ahtry
02-28-2014, 10:41 PM
Hello

I do have an issue. I am in the trades and it is hard to find a good worker. He is very good at what he does. My issue is his attitude... he is very rude, throws things and creates a bad enviroment. I don't know how much more I can take. Work wise he is amazing but our personaly we do not get along. Advice?

erikao1o
03-07-2014, 09:57 PM
It's really up to you if you want to fire this employee or not. You're going to have to ask yourself a number of questions before you come to a decision. I believe that some of these questions should include:

Is he easy to replace, could someone do the same quality of work and also be friendly?
Is there any way that you can solve his attitude problems?
Is there something that you're doing wrong? Really step back and evaluate your position in all of this.
Is he creating a negative work environment for other staff members?
Do you want someone with a poor attitude working at your company?

I would review over these questions, and possibly make a pro and con list before you proceed further.

mikelouis
03-07-2014, 11:49 PM
In any working place everybody is replaceable. The employee is being arrogant probably because you have shown him that the company depends on him for development. He must understand that it is the whole company team, Give him a fair share of warnings then kick him out if he does not change. Am sure when the position is open, you will find someone else who knows might be even better.

Lostvalleyguy
03-08-2014, 01:07 AM
Are the other employees being affected by his negative attitude? He may do good work, but if others around him are being negatively impacted by his behavior the overall benefit of having him may be negative. Talk to him - though it may not go well. You are the boss, tell him to reel in his behavior or to leave.

Rainman
03-08-2014, 03:46 AM
No one is irreplaceable. There are plenty more fish in sea if you cast your net in the right places.

My advice is rather direct. Fire the employee and find another one. Your fear is that you won't find another who's as good? Well you need to take that risk. You could do it this way. Retain the worker while you try to find someone else . . .

mikelouis
03-08-2014, 03:51 AM
I think that in any business, anyone is replaceable and you should replace the guy asap before he ruins the morale of other workers. There is no need to keep someone who can not follow simple company policies.

strokeontent
03-08-2014, 05:18 AM
If this employee is affecting the workplace environment you should probably consider it.

Keep in mind though that if he is a valuable asset you may want to simply sit down with him and try to find the source of his frustration.

Before firing the guy I would probably sit down with him and ask him what the reason for his attitude is. I would start by praising his professional skills and eventually move on to discuss his social behavior, making him aware that his ability to work in a team is as important as his other skills.

Ideally you should be talking to him 20% of the time and listening the other 80%, so feel free to prepare your questions before hand. Stuff like 'What do you think is the reason behind your behavior?', 'Is there something I can do to change it?', 'What can you do to improve it?', etc.

Then it is up to you to determine whether this is just his personality, in which case I am sure you can't do anything to change it, or if there is any issue behind it that can be discussed and resolved.

gadgetised
03-08-2014, 06:50 AM
Attitude will get nobody nowhere. Don't put up with it. The last thing you want is him telling people you are a pushover. Just let him go gently and find a new worker with a positive attitude. The workplace will benefit overall.

SoCalSurvivor
03-08-2014, 08:31 AM
I would recommend you terminate his employment as soon as possible, or at least remind him that you have the ability to do so at any given point in time. Running a business is such a time (and energy) consuming task, who has time for attitudes? A bad attitude is blatant disregard for whatever position one has been put in. I have time for ignorance, knowing all skills can be learned training has become an investment of my time. However, negative attitudes spread like wildfire, and it's easier to pull on down than to hold one up. Are you creating a hostile work environment by continuing to allow this employee push his limits? I regret to inform you things are likely going to get progressively worse. Good help is out there, and with some patience I'm sure you'll find it.

SteakTartare
03-08-2014, 11:41 AM
My issue is his attitude... he is very rude, throws things and creates a bad enviroment.

It sounds like he is creating a hostile work environment for you and other employees. Personally, I would have a candid chat with him and let him know in no uncertain terms the nonsense stops now. If that message doesn't get across the first time, give him his walking papers. There are few things as destructive to a productive work environment than someone who is constantly a source of negativity.

DomDom
03-08-2014, 01:40 PM
Have you tried talking to him and straigthening the issue out? Try to keep him but change his attitude.

Jessi
03-08-2014, 06:28 PM
I agree with Dom Dom. Have you tried talking to him? If he knows that his job is on the line, he may cool off his attitude. He could just as easily quit as well, but this is probably for the best given that you can't stand working with him anyway. It's worth a shot to encourage him to back off, though. For me personally, when you said that he throws things, that would be a clear sign for me to get rid of a person. That's entirely inappropriate.

owesem75
03-09-2014, 07:08 AM
It maybe unfair if you focus on this guy alone. Check his environment, his team mates, perhaps you will find some more deep issues behind his attitude. In parallel, you have to talk to him, issue official letter telling him about his attitude that concerns you. If you are the owner, you can fix it. If you are just a colleague, the best way is to talk to your superior about it or request an audience with your boss when you decide to confront this guy. Just do it professionally.

delusional
03-09-2014, 02:13 PM
I agree with Dom Dom. Have you tried talking to him? If he knows that his job is on the line, he may cool off his attitude. He could just as easily quit as well, but this is probably for the best given that you can't stand working with him anyway. It's worth a shot to encourage him to back off, though. For me personally, when you said that he throws things, that would be a clear sign for me to get rid of a person. That's entirely inappropriate.

I also agree. This is also the way I would handle it. Just talk to him. Give him some kind of review and tell him what's up.

DomDom
03-09-2014, 03:48 PM
It maybe unfair if you focus on this guy alone. Check his environment, his team mates, perhaps you will find some more deep issues behind his attitude. In parallel, you have to talk to him, issue official letter telling him about his attitude that concerns you. If you are the owner, you can fix it. If you are just a colleague, the best way is to talk to your superior about it or request an audience with your boss when you decide to confront this guy. Just do it professionally.

This is a good post. Who knows, maybe the enviroment is the problem...

difrancprod
03-09-2014, 08:13 PM
If you can't take his attitude, why even make him stay. It's just not going to be pleasant working with that person anyway. I say let him go and find a replacement quick.

CeliVega
03-09-2014, 09:24 PM
Sometimes when employees find out they are the only one capable of doing some important tasks, attitude problems may arise as they know the company or organization couldn't work well without them. They might start demanding ridiculous things, or want everything to go their way because if they don't get what they want, they will not perform their tasks or duties, which is bad news for the company. Remind them that the company can find replacement in others as well. Train other employees to handle their tasks as well. Hire or outsource some outside talents that handle similar tasks or duties. They will not display any overbearing pride if they know that the company can replace them easily.

wow gold
03-10-2014, 03:38 AM
If he is doing good at his job and have a good ability,you'd better have a chat with him to let he know.you analyse all the possible result.If he doesn't change his attitude after the talk,than you can let him go.but if he realise his problem,i think a work chance can be better for both side,because no one want to lose a talented employee.

fredkawig
03-10-2014, 10:21 AM
You should try to discipline him first and warn him, get things straight with him. If you just fire him, he might file a labor case against you which is never good for a business no matter what kind.

Eagles910
03-10-2014, 10:48 AM
You need to sit down with him, and explain your grievances to your employee, and let him know that if he doesn't clean up his act he is going to be fired. A good worker is hard to find so you should not just let him go. Try to work it out first.

Mafdet
03-10-2014, 11:25 AM
Indeed attitude can be a problem but have you tried talking to him? if he's very good at what he's doing, he might actually enjoy his work and might not want to lose his job. Explain to him how his behavior affects others and work together with him to correct this. If he's willing to change, I think you should give him some time and monitor his improvement.

mikka254
03-10-2014, 05:54 PM
Business is about sacrifice sometimes. You cannot fire someone just because you don't like them. However, if their attitude affects the business, fire them immediately before that mentality rubs off on others. There is simply no need to talk to this type of person. A bad mojo can go around the office faster than a forest fire and that would affect the productivity of the business.

pr0xx1d
03-18-2014, 05:43 PM
Let him know that you have an issue with his attitude. Be sure to emphasize that you want to create an environment that meets each others needs. Firing him without talking to him about this would make you seem just as impulsive as he is.

Taru
03-19-2014, 02:14 AM
I would strongly consider letting him go if it were me. Traits like that are often deeply rooted, and even if you are able to suppress it, chances are that it will manifest in other forms down the line. Don't get me wrong, I believe people can change, but I think things like this are best handled by a professional and you as a boss may hardly be qualified to fix his psychology. If you really want to hang on to him, then maybe pay for some psychiatric help or something similar, but otherwise, I think it's best to just count your losses and take your chances with having to search for a new employee even if it takes a while.

george.shepard
03-19-2014, 05:09 AM
Before taking any action, speak with him. If there is no improvement then you can take action against him.

HeinrichM
03-19-2014, 06:59 AM
There is one important question that you need to ask. Will your business suffer if you let the employee go? If your answer is yes then it would be advisable to rather look at finding a solution to the personality clash issue. It might be a good idea to sit down with the employee and explain to him why you are concerned and allow him to provide possible solutions to the problem. If you can get his buy-in the chances are that the issue will be resolved.

DomDom
03-19-2014, 05:56 PM
There is one important question that you need to ask. Will your business suffer if you let the employee go? If your answer is yes then it would be advisable to rather look at finding a solution to the personality clash issue. It might be a good idea to sit down with the employee and explain to him why you are concerned and allow him to provide possible solutions to the problem. If you can get his buy-in the chances are that the issue will be resolved.

Good thinking. If the employee is simply vital to your business you have to play it smart and keep him!

Jane Hastings
03-19-2014, 08:15 PM
You should weigh the consequences if he stays and if he goes. Keep an open mind and try to understand him. Maybe, he's going through a tough time. When he first started, was his attitude like that? If his personality didn't change from the beginning then why did you hire him? Was it because of his qualities? or his abilities? etc. Maybe you should also do activities for your employees such as team building or a retreat or something like that. Take a step back and try to communicate with him. Talk to him and try to tell him to change and show the company that he values his job.

Gmac9100
03-19-2014, 08:20 PM
Let him know that you have an issue with his attitude. Be sure to emphasize that you want to create an environment that meets each others needs. Firing him without talking to him about this would make you seem just as impulsive as he is.

This is a great point. Something that the OP should definitely think about. This is probably the reason they are clashing so much. They both have an impulsive personality.

bingaguilar
03-20-2014, 02:12 AM
I had a supervisor before who used to remind us that in the corporate world, no one is indispensable or irreplaceable. It kept us on our toes everyday. It made us strive to do our best no matter what. Maybe your employee acts that way because he really believes that he is indispensable in your company. Maybe he felt that you were too dependent on him.

Or it could also be that he really wants out but he doesn't know how to do it, maybe he thinks he owes you so much, that you've been so good to him and he's not sure how you'll take his resignation so he's putting the ball in your corner and is just waiting for you to get fed up with him and fire him offhand. I'm just saying this because I actually had a colleague who used this tactic to get out of the company he was working for. I know it's not a very smart move on his part, because it would show up in his CV, but people do silly things when they're desperate :rolleyes:

The best thing to do, though, is talk to him and tell him the truth: that his attitude stinks and that no matter how good he is at his job, it can't cover for his lack of professional etiquette.

autograph
03-23-2014, 02:04 AM
Since he is really good at his job, you may want to talk with him about his attitude. Stress that if he is not willing to change his attitude, you will not hesitate to let him go. Let him know that nobody is indispensable. If he respects you, he will surely tone his temper down and control his emotion in the workplace.