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Mafdet
03-04-2014, 11:59 AM
i believe that when dealing with people, and in this particular scenario with employees, it's important to train them properly. After the training is finished and they begin taking on responsibilities, it's important to provide them with constant feedback in order to improve their performance. I'd like to know what feedback methods you've tried with your employees. Were they successful or not? What would you like to try other than what you've already tried?

Lostvalleyguy
03-04-2014, 04:15 PM
Working in the education field, constructive feedback is essential. However you provide that feedback, it should be consistent and impartial. Focus on the objective (good or bad) and not the person. Not "You are working too slow" but rather "We need to produce more widgets each day". Positive feedback has a payout as well, but it has to be meaningful. A bonus for the best salesman of the year is an incentive to up your game. "You keep your desk well organized" says to me that you were really struggling to say something nice because you learned it is some seminar.

janineaa
03-05-2014, 05:42 AM
Constructive feedback is information-specific, issue-focused, and based on observations. It comes in two varieties:
Praise and criticism are both personal judgments about a performance effort or outcome, with praise being a favorable judgment and criticism, an unfavorable judgment. Information given is general and vague, focused on the person, and based on opinions or feelings. Be direct when delivering your message. Get to the point and avoid beating around the bush. Both negative and positive feedback should be given in a straightforward manner.
Avoid "need to" phrases, which send implied messages that something that didn't go well. Be sincere and avoid giving mixed messages. Sincerity says that you mean what you say with care and respect. In negative feedback situations, express concern. The purpose of negative feedback is to create awareness that can lead to correction or improvement in performance.

wander_n_wonder
03-06-2014, 08:22 PM
I give short-term feedback all the time. I believe in the importance of short-interval followup because at least you are able to communicate what you like and what you like them to change before it's too late. Therefore, I would often come to them in a day or set one-on-one meetings twice a week just to be able to give these feedback. I am very direct and I tell my employees that I am like this so that when they hear me giving them an honest feedback, they will not take it personally.

Mafdet
03-07-2014, 09:38 AM
I give short-term feedback all the time. I believe in the importance of short-interval followup because at least you are able to communicate what you like and what you like them to change before it's too late. Therefore, I would often come to them in a day or set one-on-one meetings twice a week just to be able to give these feedback. I am very direct and I tell my employees that I am like this so that when they hear me giving them an honest feedback, they will not take it personally.

I completely agree with this. You should provide constant feedback and make sure at all times that you're on the same page with your employees, that the message you transmitted was properly understood. Communication is the most important aspect of the employee-employer relationship.

DomDom
03-07-2014, 03:16 PM
I think it really depends on the person. Females I mostly encourage with compliments (like for something good she did). Men are better with competition :)

StarFox64
03-08-2014, 06:32 PM
I think it really depends on the person. Females I mostly encourage with compliments (like for something good she did). Men are better with competition :)

Good stuff, and not only that, but it also matters what type of industry you are working in along with the number of employees. Jobs that are quite monotonous and can be pretty boring should have plenty of encouragement from upper management in such a way that they feel that they are together and working as a team. Jobs that foster a culture of individuality and creativity are the types of jobs that can require more individually oriented rewards that encourages competition. Basically, you need to gauge what type of employees you have. It really all depends.

mikelouis
03-09-2014, 04:37 AM
I agree that in any business, management should be more engaging with their employees to make sure that at least they feel part of the company. Continuous engagement with your employees makes it easier to tell you if there is a problem with the business and see how to resolve it.

owesem75
03-09-2014, 07:04 AM
Some companies apply KPI ratings in order to gauge the performance of their employees. Of course, after giving them significant training, they are expected to perform well. The KPI will expose their weaknesses and strength and if used positively, you may be able to strengthen those weaknesses and calibrate the employee to be the kind of worker you expect him to be. Nothing negative in using this scheme.

delusional
03-09-2014, 02:12 PM
This is especially important during the training phases. Afterwards it can be toned down but it really helps to motivate people. Just make sure they don't slack off because they don't see it as a challenge anymore.

the_jamal
03-09-2014, 10:37 PM
i believe that when dealing with people, and in this particular scenario with employees, it's important to train them properly. After the training is finished and they begin taking on responsibilities, it's important to provide them with constant feedback in order to improve their performance. I'd like to know what feedback methods you've tried with your employees. Were they successful or not? What would you like to try other than what you've already tried?

What has worked for me in the education field is focusing on the positive aspects of the person's work and framing the negative aspect of the person's work into a way where they don't feel like they're just getting yelled at for doing something wrong. It's almost always worked badly for the student and for me when I lay into the person for messing up. So instead of saying " How could you think that was the correct way to play that passage?" I'd demonstrate how I'd play it and suggest the student follow my example.

difrancprod
03-10-2014, 03:57 AM
It's cool to give positive and constructive feedback. Don't forget to always to always indicate the areas the person needs improvement. A feedback is not enough without those.

jfab
03-10-2014, 05:22 AM
Always leave them with something they will be inspired about after a critic that you said. It's always good to be inspired anyway and that will surely help them be good on their next work. Choosing words that are positive are really part of it too.

Rainman
03-13-2014, 06:48 AM
On paper/on the screen it's easy to talk about giving constructive feedback that is meant to help an employee work better, deliver better results and so on. On the ground however, it's an entirely different matter. Supposing an employee just isn't doing their job right then in such a case being diplomatic won't solve the problem.

IMO whether you're complimenting an employee or severely censuring them I think it's always best to do it bluntly. That way your employees will respect you for being forthright.

fredkawig
03-13-2014, 09:42 AM
You can try providing for a feedback box or something where they can write their feedbacks anonymously. It will encourage morale.

idlecuriosities
03-13-2014, 11:40 AM
i believe that when dealing with people, and in this particular scenario with employees, it's important to train them properly. After the training is finished and they begin taking on responsibilities, it's important to provide them with constant feedback in order to improve their performance. I'd like to know what feedback methods you've tried with your employees. Were they successful or not? What would you like to try other than what you've already tried?

Feedback is definitely important. At the same time, you need to keep in mind that you are in charge of grown adults and they don't want to have their every movement watched over, it is a little insulting. If they do something wrong, then by all means correct them but try not to single somebody out if their performance doesn't call for it.

wander_n_wonder
03-13-2014, 10:55 PM
Working in the education field, constructive feedback is essential. However you provide that feedback, it should be consistent and impartial. Focus on the objective (good or bad) and not the person. Not "You are working too slow" but rather "We need to produce more widgets each day". Positive feedback has a payout as well, but it has to be meaningful. A bonus for the best salesman of the year is an incentive to up your game. "You keep your desk well organized" says to me that you were really struggling to say something nice because you learned it is some seminar.

I agree. The educational system is a good model for constructive feedback. Just try to recall how your best teachers gave you feedback and how you responded to it. The same principle applies at the workplace. If you are very selfish when it comes to feedback, you are not really helping your employees to grow and improve on their weaknesses.

Taru
03-19-2014, 02:38 AM
I find that being straightforward is the best way to go about it. Beating around the bush would just make them feel like they are being treated like children, in my opinion, and I think just treating them with respect will suffice even as you criticize them. That's not to say that I don't pull punches, because I do. I will often use lighter words, but nonetheless, I try to make it as straight to the point as possible and I always offer solutions and suggestions on how they can then go about solving a particular issue.

HeinrichM
03-19-2014, 07:25 AM
When providing feedback to an employee it is very important to ensure that there are clear guidelines. One of the better options is to make use of a balanced scorecard with clear desired outcomes included. The balanced scorecard will allow you to discuss each performance area and the employee's rating. The employee should be allowed to offer possible solutions and/or actions and time frames. With a balanced scorecard you take all of the emotion away and it makes it a lot easier to gain the employee's buy-in. Hope this helps you!

ursell
03-26-2014, 07:25 PM
I agree with constructive feedback is good as long as the boss does it the right way.