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Mafdet
03-10-2014, 12:16 PM
I see that others are struggling with attitude issues when it comes to employees. What are your stories and how do you manage such people? Would you fire somebody just because of their attitude?

mikka254
03-10-2014, 05:44 PM
Attitude cannot be corrected with attitude. Simply talk to the employee and talk to them about their bad attitude. The work place is not a place to make friends, therefore do not be afraid to tell them exactly what you think about their bad attitude.

LindaKay
03-10-2014, 05:45 PM
I agree -- it is never a good idea to give attitude back. You need to talk to these employees and tell them that this type of attitude and behavior can't be tolerated in the workplace. If you lead by example, you can tell them that you don't use that kind of attitude and won't tolerate it from any of your employees either.

fredkawig
03-11-2014, 01:21 AM
If I were the boss and not a co-owner I would fire somebody and replace them with my preferences. If the reason is because they cheat on you, don't care about your business at all then that would be my reasons for firing a person.

dora M
03-11-2014, 02:55 AM
I have the attitude that my employees have to be enthusiastic and happy about the job I provide them with. I would do my level best to create a good atmosphere at the work place, so that they actually enjoy working for me. I would give a lot but also expect a lot in return, especially commitment and loyalty, which are equally important to me as is constant focus on success. It's possible.

crimsonghost747
03-11-2014, 11:40 AM
Would I fire someone because they had attitude problems? YES!
That is the number one reason why I would fire anyone. A horrible attitude is not welcome, even if they get the work done.

I have worked both with people who have a great attitude yet can't get anything done properly and decent people with a horrible attitude and I'd rather have the first option. Even if they are not that productive, at least they won't affect the work of others and seeing as they want to do their best, they will usually improve as time goes by.

Mafdet
03-11-2014, 11:46 AM
The one example that I can give you from my experience is about an employee who constantly makes up stories about his colleagues, spreads them around, likes to get the other employees to hate and sabotage their superiors and lies through his teeth when confronted about it. He gets the job done but in the meantime, he creates a very tense atmosphere around himself.

owesem75
03-11-2014, 12:28 PM
You can understand that people with attitude may have some problems at home. Bringing it in the workplace can be interpreted as just "seeking an audience". the best way to deal with them is to IGNORE them and just focus on their work. Demand results and always align him to the standard procedure required to complete his work, no more no less.

SteakTartare
03-11-2014, 02:37 PM
It depends on so many factors, it is hard to provide a one size fits all solution. In general though:


I'd like to find out what the source of the attitude is. Is it legit? Can something be changed? Is the employee just burned out and needs a vacation? Or is he/she just a malcontent?
If the employee is just a malcontent, I would make it clear that we're here to work, not grouse. If that continued, a removal would be an option. Negative attitudes are very contagious.
If the friction is due to two personalities that simply cannot get along together and there is a possibility of reassignment, that can be looked into.
If the negativity is impacting the client-base and therefore the bottom line adios!. They are gone because, at the end of the day, we're here to turn a profit, not be a psychiatrist.

M.K
03-11-2014, 03:43 PM
If it's affecting their work or others' then it should be addressed. I often let it slide if the employee in question consistently delivers quality work. I think a person's output is what's most important and I don't typically require that things be done any one way.

StompnNubs
03-11-2014, 03:47 PM
If you're talking about a retail business, just dont put up with bullshit. Be straightforward and hold every employee accountable for their actions. The best systems are warning based, get too many warnings, you're fired end of story.

What usually happens when you're getting attitude problems is that employes dont feel equal, or they arent held accountable for their actions.

If their attitude is losing customers, they are stealing from you! They are taking money out of your pocket because they're unhappy in some way, which doesn't work for either of you. You need to make money for you to pay them, so their best interest is doing everything they can to make the business successful. If they can't contribute to that then you need to find someone who will.

SteakTartare
03-11-2014, 08:04 PM
If their attitude is losing customers, they are stealing from you!

Exactly! I learned a piece of advice way back in my teens from an old businessman—"Every contact with the customer is an opportunity to solidify the business relationship." Simply put, every time you interact with them, you get a chance to keep them coming back. Now if you have an employee souring that relationship, well, sayonara. It may sound hard, but your workers are your primary face to your customer/clients and you can't have that be a problematic one.

delusional
03-12-2014, 04:33 AM
Give them one chance to change. If they don't change, fire them. It's bad for your business and bad for your reputation. Employees have to understand that.

eppie
03-12-2014, 06:33 AM
If you're talking about a retail business, just dont put up with bullshit. Be straightforward and hold every employee accountable for their actions. The best systems are warning based, get too many warnings, you're fired end of story.

What usually happens when you're getting attitude problems is that employes dont feel equal, or they arent held accountable for their actions.

If their attitude is losing customers, they are stealing from you! They are taking money out of your pocket because they're unhappy in some way, which doesn't work for either of you. You need to make money for you to pay them, so their best interest is doing everything they can to make the business successful. If they can't contribute to that then you need to find someone who will.

I agree :)

Even if we are dealing with a small business, it's still important to have a set of rules that need to be implemented and observed by all employees. Fortunately, I don't have employees with "attitude" as I make sure to screen applicants very carefully and likewise explain to them the importance of following company rules and procedures or else suffer the consequences. :)

autograph
03-12-2014, 09:04 AM
It is never wise to fight fire with fire. As an employer, we have to be the sensible one when we are dealing with employees with bad attitude. I would ensure that we have a talk regarding his attitude and how it has affected the atmosphere in the office. Hopefully, the person will realize the bad vibe he has been giving people and try to fix it.

Lostvalleyguy
03-12-2014, 02:50 PM
A bad attitude is often a symptom of something that may or may not be related to the workplace. It may not be possible to correct the issue if it is not work related. What to do about it depends a lot on the nature of the job and how the attitude is affecting it. In the service industry a bad attitude may cost customers and should not be tolerated period. As a customer, I don't care that the server is having a bad day, I expect good service. If the employee is working fine and is away from the public eye, one will still have to deal with it, but one can be a little more forgiving.

SmartPea85
03-12-2014, 02:57 PM
I think attitude is everything in the workplace. It sets the tone for the business and the general morale of the workers. I had a co-worker put up SUCH a fight about cleaning the bathroom at work that the manager ended up firing her. The employee somehow believed she was above this job, even though it was a responsibility everyone (including managers) shared. She refused so profoundly and vocalized her opinion in such a nasty way, it was unprofessional and disrespectful toward the manager, the company and her fellow employees.

Being treated equally is important in the work place, but this should be understood by both management AND employees. Employees shouldn't be allowed to think anyone is better or given special treatment over any other employee. In the end, she didn't clean the bathroom, but she also didn't have a job anymore.

wander_n_wonder
03-13-2014, 10:50 PM
You can't really fire people just like that. There has to be a due process. Also, there has be regular feedback before you even arrive at the decision to fire. You should call the attention of the employee and discuss what particular attitudes you are concerned about. Set a specific action plan with him in order to resolve it. Give him several chance to change and make it clear to him what the consequences will be if changes are not seen.

mikelouis
03-14-2014, 01:31 AM
It depends with how their attitude affects the business. If a person brings their attitude to the business environment, then I have no option but just fire them. These people with attitudes will make it hard for other people to work and this means the business gets affected.

Mafdet
03-18-2014, 03:15 PM
It depends on so many factors, it is hard to provide a one size fits all solution. In general though:


I'd like to find out what the source of the attitude is. Is it legit? Can something be changed? Is the employee just burned out and needs a vacation? Or is he/she just a malcontent?
If the employee is just a malcontent, I would make it clear that we're here to work, not grouse. If that continued, a removal would be an option. Negative attitudes are very contagious.
If the friction is due to two personalities that simply cannot get along together and there is a possibility of reassignment, that can be looked into.
If the negativity is impacting the client-base and therefore the bottom line adios!. They are gone because, at the end of the day, we're here to turn a profit, not be a psychiatrist.


Thank you for this insight. I agree with you entirely and I think that every situation requires analysis. It's very important to find the reason behind the attitude that's being displayed and not just assume it can not be worked with.

SteakTartare
03-18-2014, 04:22 PM
Thank you for this insight. I agree with you entirely and I think that every situation requires analysis. It's very important to find the reason behind the attitude that's being displayed and not just assume it can not be worked with.

I am glad the details were of interest. Indeed, there are times when it can be turned around, while others not. I can think of few examples in my professional life of both. A couple appear below.

Office Manager Malcontent: Years ago I worked with a lady that was always complaining, grousing, and being negative. She'd corner coworkers and whine about this, that, and the other thing. Every department she interacted with, it was the same story. I know management talked to her repeatedly, but nothing changed. Finally, she resigned and went to work elsewhere. It was like a dark cloud lifting from the whole operation. Turns out, according to her past employers, it was the same song and dance from her. Looking back in hindsight, which is always 20/20, there likely was nothing any of us could have done to make things work.

IT Guy Change: There was once an younger IT guy at one of our operations who was happy-go-lucky and productive for years. Slowly, over the matter of a few months, he started to act totally different: distant, stormy personality, real high stress behavior, etc. Finally me and another management type sat down and talked with him. Turns out his marriage was on the rocks (divorced about a year later), his wife had caused financial problems, and he had some health issues come up. While one should never bring negativity into the office, we understood and his radically changed personality suddenly made sense. He was given some time off, he later finished the divorce, and went back to being the good worker he was before. We could have taken the track of coming down hard on him, but a little understanding and some vacation time off to handle his affairs went a long way.

pr0xx1d
03-18-2014, 05:47 PM
Don't fight fire with fire. As an employer, you always have to be the better person. Talk to them about how you can create an environment where both parties win.

angelicagapit
03-18-2014, 08:13 PM
The attitudes of your employees greatly affect the way your business runs. Bad attitudes such as laziness, bad temperament, and stubbornness are things that shouldn't exist in the workplace.

Imagine going to a restaurant and an employee is rude to you when taking your orders and serving you. Would you go back to that restaurant? I'm trying to say that if your customers notice the way your employees act, they might think badly of the business in general. Avoid hiring or keeping employees that don't have the right attitude to do business well. It slows time and your business could do much better.

nick87
03-18-2014, 08:43 PM
I would fire someone because of their attitude. It's not like it's hard to find a replacement, there are tons of people out there desperately trying to get a job who can fill the position immediately without any problems with their attitude.
If you're their boss, you tell them to do something, and they give you attitude and don't do the work, they're not very useful to have around anyways.

Taru
03-19-2014, 02:06 AM
It depends on the degree of attitude the person has and the level of effect it has on my business. If it were just minor such as being a bit too talkative, then I wouldn't mind it and if it's negligible enough, I might not even point it out. If, however, the talkativeness makes his or her performance a lot less efficient, then I will surely bring it up and try to have him or her correct it. If he or she isn't able to correct it, then I would believe it to be something deeply rooted and I will just call it quits right there. I've fortunately never had to deal with an employee with a big enough attitude problem, but unfortunately, I have had to deal with ones who steal, so I guess I can appreciate it if it's just a little attitude I have to deal with.

Jane Hastings
03-19-2014, 08:40 PM
If your employees have attitude issues, I think the best thing to do is talk to them. Talk to them and if it doesn't work then you should let them go through a personality development. Make them go through a personality development but only to those employees who you think are important to your company. Keep those who have potential and help them to grow.

bingaguilar
03-22-2014, 03:16 AM
I think if the person's attitude is already creating a negative atmosphere in the office and affecting other people's work, then yes, I would consider firing him. But then, it would also depend on a couple of factors:

1. Was he always like this, or did this attitude problem just came out of the blue?
- If the person had this attitude problem from the start, then it would mean that there's no chance of changing him. If he was not like that before and he suddenly changed, then I would talk to him and ask him what caused the sudden change. It could be that he's going through some difficult times, like a divorce, loss of a partner, loss of a parent, an undisclosed illness, financial troubles, etc. If it's just a phase he's going through, then maybe you can give him another chance. But make him aware of his effect on others. Let him prove himself and see if he reverts to his old self. If he does not, then let him go.

2. Does he do exceptional work?
- If he's a good worker and you think he has a lot of potential, maybe you can talk to him first. Tell him about the negative atmosphere he is creating in the workplace. Maybe he was not aware that he was being obnoxious to his colleagues.

It will still be your decision in the end, though, if you can tolerate his attitude or not :)

DomDom
03-22-2014, 05:43 AM
I think if the person's attitude is already creating a negative atmosphere in the office and affecting other people's work, then yes, I would consider firing him. But then, it would also depend on a couple of factors:

1. Was he always like this, or did this attitude problem just came out of the blue?
- If the person had this attitude problem from the start, then it would mean that there's no chance of changing him. If he was not like that before and he suddenly changed, then I would talk to him and ask him what caused the sudden change. It could be that he's going through some difficult times, like a divorce, loss of a partner, loss of a parent, an undisclosed illness, financial troubles, etc. If it's just a phase he's going through, then maybe you can give him another chance. But make him aware of his effect on others. Let him prove himself and see if he reverts to his old self. If he does not, then let him go.

2. Does he do exceptional work?
- If he's a good worker and you think he has a lot of potential, maybe you can talk to him first. Tell him about the negative atmosphere he is creating in the workplace. Maybe he was not aware that he was being obnoxious to his colleagues.

It will still be your decision in the end, though, if you can tolerate his attitude or not :)

The exceptional work category is the most important one I would consider to be honest. Thats the main thing!

GottBiz
03-27-2014, 04:23 AM
There is 'way' too much to consider here. Management styles, business goals, other personalities and the type of value that you have regarding others that you have employed. There simply is not a one size fit all answer here. I personally like to have a good family environment when I am working. But even that is open to so much variability.

You have for instance the family where everyone is warm and inviting, sort of like the Leave it to Beaver, or Father Know Best family where everyone gets a long but only one or two people sort of head up things and keep the minor scuffles worked out. Then you have the Archie Bunker family where the head of business is the problem but everyone works together inspite of him or sometimes because they all care about the curmudgeon :-)

I could keep going here if you want, but I think you get the idea. You have to figure out what works and keep it going. I just hope you don't have a "Family Guy" family there, but then I suppose there are some people that might make that work too :-)

MahaKarthi
10-16-2014, 04:50 AM
I think if the person's attitude is already creating a negative atmosphere in the office and affecting other people's work, then yes, I would consider firing him. But then, it would also depend on a couple of factors:

1. Was he always like this, or did this attitude problem just came out of the blue?
- If the person had this attitude problem from the start, then it would mean that there's no chance of changing him. If he was not like that before and he suddenly changed, then I would talk to him and ask him what caused the sudden change. It could be that he's going through some difficult times, like a divorce, loss of a partner, loss of a parent, an undisclosed illness, financial troubles, etc. If it's just a phase he's going through, then maybe you can give him another chance. But make him aware of his effect on others. Let him prove himself and see if he reverts to his old self. If he does not, then let him go.

2. Does he do exceptional work?
- If he's a good worker and you think he has a lot of potential, maybe you can talk to him first. Tell him about the negative atmosphere he is creating in the workplace. Maybe he was not aware that he was being obnoxious to his colleagues.

It will still be your decision in the end, though, if you can tolerate his attitude or not :)


It’s necessary to make them understand what goes wrong with poor attitude. Many say attitude they have developed from childhood and they can never change. I truly disagree with this point, when you allow chance for everything, why not on this matter. Tone them properly and towards right path, time, situation and life gradually teaches them everything

MahaKarthi
01-05-2015, 01:02 AM
It is always better to speak about the bad attitude problem with the employees when it seriously affects the working process in a company. Because, it is always better to speak about the process in the starting level than to complicate it at the final stage.
My friend who now works in Piterion (It is an international PLM, IT and Engineering service Provider Company) loves his job very much, as all the staff works closely with each other and they always help their fellow colleagues in need. So, an environment where each other helps for others improvement will surely take the organization to the next level.