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alec
03-26-2014, 12:20 PM
Right now I'm documenting and learning about a few business ideas that involve farming and the growing of plants.

Growing fruit trees, nut trees to be more precise - walnut and hazelnut, sounds like a good idea. Apart from the initial investment: land and tools, the maintenance cost of a nut tree plantation is not that high. The trees are not prone to disease and like all trees, provided the land is good and enough water is present, they grow all by themselves. The nuts are expensive and the yield high. The only downside would be that walnut trees take a lot of time to mature and bare fruit (hazelnut trees are quick to do this).

From your experience or things you heard, how does this sound?

Rainman
03-27-2014, 05:35 AM
Well it all really counts on how patient you are. There's no denying if you have a large piece of land, you could make a lot of money from the fruit trees after they start producing fruits. And the best thing about that is you'll consistently get fruit when the season is right.

There's a man I saw on TV who planted mango trees and well, it took some waiting but when he started reaping the fruits of his patience . . .

In fact, one could grow fruit trees as a some kind of investment. Come to think of it, I could try it myself.

owesem75
03-27-2014, 05:50 AM
You really need a lot and careful planning in engaging in the farming business. While investing on trees/plants that bear nut (which I agree with you, are expensive), you must have a plot for those plants that bear fruits easily so you will have some income while waiting for the main investments (plants) to yield.

Also, you have to consider the type/kind of plants that you will work with because sometimes, there are plants that doesnt go well together near or on the same location.

Good luck to you!

Taru
03-28-2014, 02:31 AM
This does sound very promising, and I wish you good luck with it! I think the thing to look out for when it comes to farming is to set something up to earn from on the off seasons wherein you aren't yielding your main crops yet, and also, it might be best to have a plan on what to do with your scraps and waste materials as you most likely would want to be able to make use or profit off of everything your farm produces.

upandcoming
03-28-2014, 05:13 AM
This sounds more like a side business than a primary source of income. If I had a substantial amount of land, it is something I would consider as a long term investment. You may want to contact people in your area that are already doing this and find out what they have to say about potential issues and how to get started. I am a firm believer in getting to know people in any field of endeavor one is considering. If you can't find any local growers, go the the local flea markets and look for nut vendors. They can tell you where the local growers are and how to contact them. Good luck with this interesting venture!

crimsonghost747
03-28-2014, 08:49 AM
That is actually a very interesting idea. Just be sure to do A LOT of research as some trees are a lot harder to grow than others. Pests, animals eating the nuts or damaging the trees etc can all quickly end up costing a lot. Nuts are a good choice though because they don't go bad that quick, whereas most fruits would have to be sold within a day or two of when they are collected.

Good luck and let us know how it goes, definitely an interesting idea and I'd certainly think about it myself if I'd own land.

alec
04-01-2014, 04:02 AM
This sounds more like a side business than a primary source of income. If I had a substantial amount of land, it is something I would consider as a long term investment. You may want to contact people in your area that are already doing this and find out what they have to say about potential issues and how to get started. I am a firm believer in getting to know people in any field of endeavor one is considering. If you can't find any local growers, go the the local flea markets and look for nut vendors. They can tell you where the local growers are and how to contact them. Good luck with this interesting venture!

Well, I already own some land and that's where I plan to run the initial tests. There are no growers of nut trees in my area (as in mass growing/plantation) but the trees do grow and thrive in that land. Most people have one or two in their back yard/garden.

@ crimsonghost747
Yeah, pests are something I'm considering. The area where I own land in is near a forest and we do have wild boars and plenty of squires. Then there's also the problem of human 'pests' that like to steal a lot :) I'm thinking that fences and a hired person to patrol around would work just fine.

gadgetised
04-01-2014, 04:49 AM
If you do go through with this, you should document it all online. Many people would be interested in knowing how to do this kind of stuff. You could almost make a how to website.

fredkawig
04-01-2014, 07:30 AM
Growing fruit trees are good if you have a big space or a big farm and you have workers and machinery. Although you can do it by yourself which is good for small businesses and farmlands.

crimsonghost747
04-02-2014, 04:03 AM
@ crimsonghost747
Yeah, pests are something I'm considering. The area where I own land in is near a forest and we do have wild boars and plenty of squires. Then there's also the problem of human 'pests' that like to steal a lot :) I'm thinking that fences and a hired person to patrol around would work just fine.

Hiring a security guard might be a bit excessive unless you have a super massive area we are talking about. And even then I think it would be a bit overkill, since let's face it. You will not have someone come and steal such large amounts of produce that it would cost you more than hiring a security guard.
I've seen fences used this way, not sure how effective they are though.

Strykstar
04-03-2014, 05:52 AM
I think this is a great idea as a side business, especially if the trees thrive there and you have no competition like you say.
If it goes well you could even expand and plant trees that harvest at different seasons so you could turn it into your main activity.