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DSK83
05-10-2005, 10:42 PM
Two good friends and I are planning to open up a resturant. We have no prior professional experience with opening a physical business and could use some pointers as to the major elements we should be concerned with.

Does anyone know what regulations (ie. food handlers liscense, business liscense, tax id) are required to open a resturant? We already know what food we will be serving, how it will be prepared and such. However our lack of experience in starting a physical store front from scratch is proving to be a challenge.

It would also be helpful if I could be given a heads up on what obstacles I may encounter when leasing a vacant building/area.

Any feedback that could point us in the right direction is greatly appreciated . :)

Ricky
06-21-2005, 11:35 PM
I would suggest trying your hand in the food industry for a year or so before you make your decision about opening a restaurant. It might be more work than you figure. Preparing, making and serving the food is the easy part.

greebo
07-13-2005, 11:29 AM
For a start you'd need a license from the the food standards commitee.

But I agree, get some training behind you. also if you don't mind me suggesting, to make your venture a bigger success, have a trade mark of some sort. A certain something to your food, like a secret ingrediant that make the dish taste better but your compatition can't figure out.

Grumpy
11-25-2005, 09:57 PM
Resturants are hard, extremely hard. I grew up in and worked in my fathers bar/ resturant which he owned for over 30 years. My uncle also owned bar/resturants. Resturants are one of the toughest businesses out there. They can be very profitable, but you have to have experience working in them. If you have no exp at all working in a resturant, your setting yourself up to fail. Very few people know just how difficult they are unless they have a good background in working in them. People dont seem to realize the time, effort, and dedication that is required in running one. You cant just have a good product (food), thats not enough, no matter how good it is. There is an unbelievable amount of work and time required with starting and keeping a resturant going.

One of the hardest problems is getting good help. Usally if a person "is of good quality", they set thier sites alot higher than being a waiter, bus boy, or cook. There are very good people out there that do those things, but they tend to be few and far between.

Another of the hard things is the time required. Resturants are one of the businessess you have to be there just about all the time its open. You have to constantly moniter the service, the quality of food coming out, the keeping the place clean, and not to mention all the unforseen things that come up through out the day (and always do).

For now, thats at least a little insight to what I have learned growing up with a father and uncle both in the business.





PS: Im also in the process of opening my own resturant, but I have an extensive background both in the working and managerial aspects of the business, having grown up in one (not to mention my uncles), and its still hard for me. Resturants are extremely difficult.

contentondemand
03-26-2006, 07:37 AM
Hello.
That is a lofty plan!
I would suggest research--lots and lots of research.
Many successful restaurant owners started their own venue after years of working at another restaurant. You learn the ropes, which are the best vendors, how to handles situations, what the best locations are, etc.

If you don't have this experience you may want to consider approaching an successful restaurant in your area (a non franchise) and ask if you can open another location for them in a different area. This way all the start-up work is done for you, and you have instant brand recognition. If the owner is willing to consider it, you will more than likely have to work as a manager in thier existing restaurant for probably a year.

But whatever you do, you should really have an operations manual from the start. This will act as a reference guide for you and any employees and by using a manual from the start you can add to it as you go, so that when you franchise you will have a complete manual. Manuals are not only reference tools, but when you franchise they become sales and legal tools as well.

Larger consulting firms charge $15K plus to create customized manuals, but if you want to save money you can develop your own, or use an expertly written template that has notes about where to input your specific information.



Good luck!

blueshift
05-01-2006, 01:32 AM
I disagree. The restaurant business can be easy and enjoyable. I hope you dont mind me giving advice. But here are a few pointers.
1. Two things that will be huge factors, in making your business a success: taste and cost.
2. Never do anything that you dont have to do. Instead, spend time on tasks, that no one else can do.
3. Advertising is the key to a successful business. Figure out new innovative ways to advertise. You dont necessarily have to spend a lot on advertising.

AGP
05-28-2006, 08:34 PM
Go to your city hall or county hall and request information. You'd be surprised how helpful they can be.

GuideyeNY
05-31-2006, 01:06 PM
I see a lot of projects for restaurants (specially living in NY), they are extremely difficult to find funds (loans), unless it is an specialized lender, (which will charge you high interest). Banks usually shy away form this types of projects. This is going to be a major obstacle for your business, not only for start up, but if you ever find yourself in a cash crunch (and it is likely that you will).

However, limited menu restaurants (such as a cheese steak shop) or franchises are easier to find capital. Many banks specialize in franchises or have set underwriting terms for them. Lastly, experience is key, if you don't have it, then work in the industry for some time and then decide when and how to open the restaurant.

Another alternative, is to open a franchise, you will get operational training and support (and that depends on the franchise) and will have an easier time finding capital. If you are in NY, visit our website, you may find some info that may help you.

hillaryNC
01-22-2014, 06:16 PM
Sounds like you need hired help!! Although it will cost you a few extra bucks, it will be way better then getting your business on the go and then getting in trouble because you didn't have everything covered and taken care of. Your business can be successful even if you have no business background, but for somethings it might be best to have someone there to advise you on what to do.

Andy1982
02-07-2014, 05:50 AM
Two good friends and I are planning to open up a resturant. We have no prior professional experience with opening a physical business and could use some pointers as to the major elements we should be concerned with.

Does anyone know what regulations (ie. food handlers liscense, business liscense, tax id) are required to open a resturant? We already know what food we will be serving, how it will be prepared and such. However our lack of experience in starting a physical store front from scratch is proving to be a challenge.

It would also be helpful if I could be given a heads up on what obstacles I may encounter when leasing a vacant building/area.

Any feedback that could point us in the right direction is greatly appreciated . :)

You can get in touch with your local eviornmental people, whoever they might be, I live in Ireland so it's the department of fisherys and food. They can give you a run down of all the things you need to have set up with toilets, access, food certs, layout and how to mark and rotate food stuffs. They will give you a list to work from that will satisfy what they need from you.

Getting a good accountant who has maybe just started out so the price will be more attractive than someone set up for years. Keep all reciepts and a book of what you spend and buy; something just very simple but always good to get into doing it. Search out good local suppliers and bounce them off eachother to get the best price and keep reviewing who you use to get the best out of them.

fredkawig
02-07-2014, 07:26 AM
Even though this post was long long ago. You should definitely check your local laws for business permits and license fees, payable taxes to your city or state. You should definitely ask for health permits, sanitations permit and other permits in order for your business to be 100% legitimate. You can hire people to teach you what to do to start even just for contractual or for a definite period of time.

delusional
02-07-2014, 12:18 PM
Even though this post was long long ago. You should definitely check your local laws for business permits and license fees, payable taxes to your city or state. You should definitely ask for health permits, sanitations permit and other permits in order for your business to be 100% legitimate. You can hire people to teach you what to do to start even just for contractual or for a definite period of time.

Eventhough this topic is very old, this is still a great summary for what is needed to start a food business. We should make a new topic with small summaries like this. And then depending on the field of business, you just pick a summary that suits the business.

SmartPea85
03-20-2014, 01:58 PM
Even open those doors for your grand opening, you'll need many inspections to make sure the building itself is up to code, including the kitchen and food prep areas. The health board will need to clear you, the fire marshal will need to make an appearance to check for capacity and fire safety, and you'll probably also need to have your building checked and cleared for lead paint & Co2. And don't forget, you need to pay for each of these inspections; most places don't come out and do them for free.

stockbrokers
10-01-2014, 10:44 AM
dont forget to apply HACCP Standard

noface0711
03-17-2016, 10:11 AM
I would suggest trying your hand in the food industry for a year or so before you make your decision about opening a restaurant. It might be more work than you figure. Preparing, making and serving the food is the easy part.:)

oscaradcock
01-09-2017, 10:44 PM
Try to gain maximum knowledge about the industry. Do more and more research before opening the restaurant. And try to do marketing for your business.

ardeedelarosa
09-12-2017, 12:03 AM
Hi. We can help you get noticed online by getting your restaurant and menu promoted by listing it on our mobile app for free. The mobile app is called Yeescana and it has the tools for menu viewing, sharing and more. We have advanced tools as well for online ordering which is under development. Visit our website at doozone.com to know more.

EdwardParkernl
01-01-2019, 10:43 PM
Yes, Restaurant business is not so easy. You really need hard work. I suggest you create the proper plan of your business, your goals and also the financial details.

Anglinia
02-05-2019, 12:22 AM
For the business. You can create your communication network. Also, you can increase the services quality with create a proper business planning.

Anglinia
06-12-2019, 03:45 AM
Start new restaurant. It is such a good idea. Must serve quality food. It help to enhance your business.

Divya Uplogic
08-08-2019, 02:34 AM
Hi There,


According to me, When you are decided to start your own restaurant business, It would be a nice idea nowadays, because the restaurant business now become one of the revenue generation business industry, many newbies are started this business with the help of restaurant management software and food ordering and delivery apps, these technological advancements play major roles in their success, I would suggest you before starting your restaurant business, you must know the benefits of having restaurant management software and how it will be easy for you to manage and run your restaurant business effortlessly.

Abe Grossman
08-26-2019, 10:24 AM
I have long years of experience in the restaurant industry. It is very important to see the entire picture of restaurant business and restaurant life before you make a decision. It is impossible to give even a snapshot of the life in restaurant business in a forum.

Recently, I read a great book. It was the most accurate book as far as describing how it is and what it takes to be in the restaurant business. I strongly recommend it. It is called Right Start by John Molina.

Good luck,

Divya Uplogic
11-30-2019, 04:07 AM
Hi There,

According to me, Starting a restaurant business is not a big thing, Anybody can start this business in any region, But increasing your business visibility apart from your region is very important to take your restaurant to the next level. I would suggest you build your own website or mobile apps to provide your service via online, It will be easy for your customers to order the food from their home and easy to reserve the tables when they want.

vondes
02-25-2020, 09:35 AM
hello folks, please advise me a reliable site where one can order kitchen equipment for a restaurant. our restaurant specializes in fish dishes so we will need some special tools. Found this site https://ianboer.com.au/cooking-equipment/ here, I like everything! I want to hear reviews about products if anyone bought something there

vasanthanju
02-27-2020, 07:08 AM
Your restaurant menu will likely be fluid, changing many times as you begin to see what your diners enjoy the most, however, itís important that you put your best foot forward to keep guests coming back.
Birthday Cakes (https://cakesquarechennaionline.com/collections/birthday-collections)

hellobruno
12-18-2020, 12:48 AM
I agree with this guy. Helping a restaurant is definitely hard and it takes your time and energy. Hope you succeded :)