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nathancser
03-12-2006, 06:31 PM
Hi,

I am starting a job site for highschool/college students to find jobs and I am stumped on finding ways to get local businesses to use my service to post jobs. Any ideas?

I was thinking direct mail campaigns but I have no idea how to do it and how much money is required. I am on a very limited budget. Any advice is welcome.

profitxchange
03-14-2006, 09:58 AM
Idea is worth a try.

See ifyou can get the local newspaper interested in writing an article about your idea and the benefits employers will have using scholl leavers and particularly your service.

It is a story that has lots of angles, new buisness, new business idea, helping the local community - business and school leavers.

It is critical you put together a bullet list of the real benefits all parties will get out of your idea. Not touchy feely but real hard nosed stuff.

The journalist will put all the words around you bullet points.

Should cost you nothing! Do not fall for the usual trade of advertising slace for the article. Its news!

You can also use your article to send to businesses with follow-ups at peak recruitment times, summer hols, xmas, etc.

firebringer
03-14-2006, 11:05 AM
I would simply ask them. One posibility is to contact each one to register them as a an employer user of the service. Give them a number and tell them that they can list their jobs with you over the phone, or net, by using their number. They might be interested in the conveneience of not having to fill out all of the address, phone, and contact information over and over again.

All the best,

Jess Huffman

nathancser
03-15-2006, 12:08 AM
Idea is worth a try.

See ifyou can get the local newspaper interested in writing an article about your idea and the benefits employers will have using scholl leavers and particularly your service.

It is a story that has lots of angles, new buisness, new business idea, helping the local community - business and school leavers.

It is critical you put together a bullet list of the real benefits all parties will get out of your idea. Not touchy feely but real hard nosed stuff.

The journalist will put all the words around you bullet points.

Should cost you nothing! Do not fall for the usual trade of advertising slace for the article. Its news!

You can also use your article to send to businesses with follow-ups at peak recruitment times, summer hols, xmas, etc.
Actually, that will work because my regional paper has started writing articles about local businesses. Mine is for local businesses and is a local business. Wow, how fortunate am to have this.
I also like the personalization of calling each business with a pitch but it will take a while to call all 2000-4000 local businesses in the phone book.

Eminenent
03-18-2006, 09:12 PM
Why not be direct..just go to the high schools and the college campuses and ask them if you could post a sign or advertisement in the yearbook or purchase a banner space for them to set up at their home games.

try to get inudation of your name and type of businesst to the mass without littering the parking lots or the area in which you live in.

Even your local grocery stores they have bulletin board you can use.

Try that ..it is cheap and free and will reach the mass fairly quick

Sean

nathancser
03-18-2006, 09:22 PM
Why not be direct..just go to the high schools and the college campuses and ask them if you could post a sign or advertisement in the yearbook or purchase a banner space for them to set up at their home games.

try to get inudation of your name and type of businesst to the mass without littering the parking lots or the area in which you live in.

Even your local grocery stores they have bulletin board you can use.

Try that ..it is cheap and free and will reach the mass fairly quick

Sean

I am assuming you meant for marketing to the teens. I have already decided to use these methods but what I really am stumped on is how to market to local businesses who will post the jobs for the students to look at.

typome
03-21-2006, 05:39 PM
I agree with the advice already given, but would also like to add that perhaps you can emphasize that the businesses will be hiring local job hunters. Highlight the whole, 'let's build our community' deal by saying your website has the advantage of sticking to local employees, not just random people. Sort of town pride, you know? Create that nostalgia, perhaps? Or even make them feel that they are supporting your town's youth by doing so, etc.

BusinessWarrior
03-22-2006, 11:10 AM
If you take a step backwards, and put yourself in the shoes of an 'average' business in your area - what are the challenges you would face with regard to employment?

What is the current cost to a business owner of attracting recruits?
What is the cost of making a mistake because there weren't enough recruits to choose from? (The fewer the recruits, the more likely a bad decision.)
What is the cost of recruiting someone from out of town?
What do the local recruitment agencies charge?
What is the value of an additional citation/link pointing to the business owner's website?
What is the marketing value of being seen to support local youngsters?
How much time would a steady stream of applicants save the business owner?

In my experience the quickest way to find out this stuff is to sit down with a few local business owners. Don't tell them what you're planning - otherwise you'll be tempted to launch into sales mode. Rather ask them as many open ended questions as you can - along the lines above - about their staffing challenges. And let them talk. They're a mine of information, and they will point you towards the issues that they think are important. (These are the benefits that you will focus on to get them interested later.) Once you know those, it's a lot simpler to identify who is going to be attracted to the service you're planning on providing.

(And don't forget to get their email addresses and permission to keep them in the loop!) As long as you're adding value to their perceived problems, you're on the right tack.

Good luck.

typome
03-23-2006, 02:34 PM
Fantastic advice above; approach them in a way that you're the problem solver, not the salesman. "I'm here to help you, not to take your money" tone.

RMMarketer
04-09-2006, 04:39 PM
wow you have a great idea and you shouldnt have any trouble at all viral marketing your site. If you email a link to hr professionals from the companies you target you can get them interested pretty quickly if they are interested in teen work force. HR people are always on the lookout for ways to streamline their processes. If your site offers some teen with good work ethic and/or skill sets...you will build a reputation pretty quickly and people will look to your site as their primary reference. maybe you could consider a "spotlight" section where you can call out particular teens that would make a definate asset to an organization....much of this depends on how you set up your site.

Also, if you can partner with a company say, for example, McDonald's or someone who uses teen work force and you can get them to get some good results, they might add an endorsement to your site --

lots of good stuff is very easy for a site like yours that would virtually sell itself

ByteFortressAaron
04-15-2006, 08:25 PM
Idea is worth a try.

See ifyou can get the local newspaper interested in writing an article about your idea and the benefits employers will have using scholl leavers and particularly your service.

It is a story that has lots of angles, new buisness, new business idea, helping the local community - business and school leavers.

It is critical you put together a bullet list of the real benefits all parties will get out of your idea. Not touchy feely but real hard nosed stuff.

The journalist will put all the words around you bullet points.

Should cost you nothing! Do not fall for the usual trade of advertising slace for the article. Its news!

You can also use your article to send to businesses with follow-ups at peak recruitment times, summer hols, xmas, etc.

I like that idea. News papers are always willing to write articles on new businesses, more so if it effects local children and young adults in a positive way. I would try that method.

bizdev
05-04-2006, 12:19 PM
Press Release

Nothing beats a press release for widespread, FREE publicity.
But, rather than rely on bullet points and assuming a jounalist will fill in the blanks...learn to write your own, complete press release.

I did that and got incredible, immediate results. I emailed my story per each newspaper's instructions. And I also sent it to prweb.com. Within 30 minutes of sending it out a reporter called to schedule an interview. A full article was written along with several color photos. From that story other newspapers picked it up and sent their own reporters and photographers. From prweb a national tv show wanted to do a story about the franchise. This continued for months after writing one press release!

The trick is in how you write it.

Geetha
07-29-2021, 02:39 AM
Manage Your Listing in Search Engines. ...
Target Nearby Social Media Users. ...
Participate With Online Professional Groups. ...
Sponsor Local Events. ...
Follow Up With Customers. ...
Register With Local Business Directories.

Nags
08-01-2021, 10:54 AM
Mine is for local businesses and is a local business. Wow, how fortunate am to have this.
I also like the personalization of calling each business with a pitch but it will take a while to call all 2000-4000 local businesses in the phone book.