Thread: expansion

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    expansion
    Our business sells gourmet pastries in a retail location. From time to time we ship an order to another county, but for the most part we are limited to a local market. We have a site going up soon and we would like to expand to offering our product to people throughout the United States and even worldwide. My question is regarding shipping internationally. How much do you up charge for processing those orders? Are their liability issues as far as shipping eatable goods? I traveled to Brazil last year with my dog and it took a mountain of paperwork to get through customs and they asked me if I was bringing plants/foods with me, I wonder if exporting has the same red tape to cut through.


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    I don't deal with edible items, so can not offer any specific advise, but I know that each country has different rules regarding importing food. As an example, I live in Canada, and every time to cross into the US they ask if we have any food with us. I believe fruit and vegetables are their main concern.

    My suggestion would be to get in contact with similar companies and ask how they handle this. If that is not an option, you will have to consult the import laws for each country you intend to do business with to ensure your potential customers will actually receive their order. This will be very time consuming, so it may be worth it to hire a lawyer who specializes in import.export of commercial goods.


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    Quote Originally Posted by AliceT View Post
    I don't deal with edible items, so can not offer any specific advise, but I know that each country has different rules regarding importing food. As an example, I live in Canada, and every time to cross into the US they ask if we have any food with us. I believe fruit and vegetables are their main concern.

    My suggestion would be to get in contact with similar companies and ask how they handle this. If that is not an option, you will have to consult the import laws for each country you intend to do business with to ensure your potential customers will actually receive their order. This will be very time consuming, so it may be worth it to hire a lawyer who specializes in import.export of commercial goods.
    This is true. Shipping edibles can be very difficult, especially if they're baked good since they can't determine the ingredients and you don't have any certificate of what is in them.
    For this reason I would stick to the US for now. (Another reason is that you should first try to get a big customer base in the US and see how much the demand will be. Not being able to deliver because the demand is too high will damage your business, even more in the baked goods field because people don't want to eat your product in a month, they actually want to eat it now but because that's not possible, as soon as possible).

    Shipping charges mostly vary with weight but I assume your product is always in the same weight category.


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    Actually I don't have much knowledge about this topic.But I think I have got something now.


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    If you are considering expansion, then, this is the right time. People have been waiting for the right time and this is the right time. - Phillip Elden


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    expansion. From the qualitative interviews, however, some interesting expansions of the definitions of ' relative ' have emerged.


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