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    It is definitely a good idea to google people these days. The amount of information about people is pretty astounding. It's good to know a bit about people that you can prepare questions more tailored to each person. Normally I would go with the more casual interview. The best way to see what somebody is really like is to make them comfortable. If someone isn't comfortable they are much more likely to spew out the same drudge that everybody says during an interview. Honestly, hearing someone talk about how hard a worker they are just isn't useful.


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    One of professor in Management shared one TIP in doing interview. He said, to know more about the person (beyond his skills), is to ask him/her if he/she knows how to cook and ask him/her to share about his/her cooking habit.

    My professor said, if the person loves to cook - and depending on how he/she relate his/her cooking habit, it will show you how the person think (in terms of the dish to cook and the way he/she gathers and prepares the ingredients), how organize he/she is (in the way he present the cooking procedure), and what cooking for him/her is all about - and then you will find his total personality. Most people who love to cook are happy to please people with their dishes and proud about what they have accomplished.


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    I would lay out a few target bullet points that you want the answers to such as:-

    1. Previous experience if any they can bring?
    2. Are they a good team player or do they work better on their own?
    3. What do they expect to get out of applying for you job?
    4. How do they feel their personality will fit into your environment?

    Something along those lines allow you to find out the maximum about the applicant without making them feel too intimidated. There's nothing worse than putting the fear of God into an already nervous person. If they relax and give you the information you're looking for, it makes the process smoother altogether.


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    The first thing I do is go over their resume with them. I might have a couple of questions about their past work experience I'd like to ask them. That way I can hear it out of their mouth instead of just on a piece of paper. Then I like to just have a casual conversation with them to see how their personality is. In doing this I'll be able to tell if they'll be able to work well with the rest of my employees. If they're too arrogant then they don't have a chance. If they seem nice and trustworthy I'll usually set them up with a second interview.


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    Quote Originally Posted by owesem75 View Post
    One of professor in Management shared one TIP in doing interview. He said, to know more about the person (beyond his skills), is to ask him/her if he/she knows how to cook and ask him/her to share about his/her cooking habit.

    My professor said, if the person loves to cook - and depending on how he/she relate his/her cooking habit, it will show you how the person think (in terms of the dish to cook and the way he/she gathers and prepares the ingredients), how organize he/she is (in the way he present the cooking procedure), and what cooking for him/her is all about - and then you will find his total personality. Most people who love to cook are happy to please people with their dishes and proud about what they have accomplished.
    As a person who loves to cook this sounds very interesting haha! According to this I would be a great employee!

    Thanks for your answers Andy and nowicki!


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    When I interview someone, I try to make the job applicant as comfortable as possible, put them in a relax state so that they don't feel like they're facing a firing squad. I know how that feels because I was involved in an interview like that and it was brutal. My approach is to make the interview more conversational and be part of a two-way discussion, rather than just firing away with cold questions and putting the prospective job applicant on the spot. That said, you should be a good listener, too, while conducting the interview, as you'll learn a lot about the prospective job applicant.

    Good Luck!


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    I think the main thing is getting the interviewee to act like their normal self. I have been in interviews, and the person who was doing it was very imitating and almost looked down on me! In other interviews the person doing it made me feel really comfortable and I could act like myself and I think they got a better idea of what I was really like. You should try to make them feel comfortable and ask them questions that relate to the job. I have had job interviews for some places, and the questions they ask you.. would make you wonder if you were in a med school interview! Just keep it relevant!!


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    I say it really depends on your work environment. If there is a lot of pressure then maybe an interview a'la firing squad is not a bad idea. When I started running a small store I needed employees who could handle both me and my demanding customers and keep a smile on. I tried to make the interviews unpredictable and serious. After that episode in life I started working in a much more laid back environment and I would take potential candidates for coffee and a walk outdoors if it was nice. I always try to get to know them and try to see if they are a hard worker and intelligent. You are looking for people that not only will fit the role, but also fit the environment. Sometimes the interviews are very short, sometimes they take very long. I never got it to an exact science. Every interview has 1 element that never changes. On my first ever interview I was asked "If you where a kitchen appliance what would you be?" and I've asked that question every interview since, usually with a weird smile on my face.


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    When I'm interviewing, I mostly just ask some of my own basic questions that informs me as to what type of person they are with regards to how passionate they would be for the job I'm hiring them for. I think it's the detail I look for the most, because a passionate person will tend to learn a lot better and will usually be the best at critical thinking for some minor decisions that I may not be present for. Basically, I do enough digging to find out if they have some leadership potential, not necessarily to lead a team but just enough to lead themselves. Also, I look at their personality if they are the type who would mesh well with my current set of employees.


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    I think that standard questions are a complete waste of time. Anything I can learn from you by asking canned questions, I'd be better off learning from your references, your online presence, and your background check. Unconventional questions reveal your personality by throwing you off your game---that's the real person, dealing with questions they were expecting. I can learn how you respond under pressure, and how quick of a thinker you are. I can learn if you like my jokes, and if we are going to get along---and if you are going to get along with the team I've painstakingly built, more importantly.


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