Thread: I'm curious.

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    I'm curious.
    So what exactly are the traits you all look for in an employee, and how do you go about finding these traits in them? A prospective employee is generally someone who isn't known at all, and you are going from trusting them NONE, to trusting them with a part of helping your business succeed, therefore there is no doubt in my mind that you all must be skeptical when looking for a new employee. Any insight?


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    I think a good hypothetical scenario question is a great way to get to know them, by which I mean I'd ask about a hypothetical situation and see how they think they should go about it. This, to me, shows how much they understand how business works and what is expected of employees, as well as finding out how well they understand the hardships and challenges of being a boss and running a company. I consider it a bonus if I find out that they will know how to work in the context of my business/company instead of expecting to be spoon fed all of the directions, which is of course still very understandable but would make me a little less sure.


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    For certain applications though, you want them to only perform a particular action in a particular situation. Ergo, there is only one right answer, but yeah, I'd believe you would be on the right track with asking a series of open-ended questions. Simple yes-no questions that I see from most employers doesn't really describe anything about the potential quality of prospective employee. Thanks for your response!


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    There are a few things I look for when I hire someone. First and foremost. I do not interview someone who has a generic resume. If their resume starts with "my objective is to find a career that I can grow in".. They can look somewhere else. A lot can be said on a resume, and if a potential employee doesn't care enough to research and spend time on making a good resume. You cant expect them to spend time making your company better.
    As far as traits go. I hire sales teams, so I want them to be easy going, persuasive, and have strong oral communication skills. I like to set up longwinded questions for them during the interview so they are forced to talk a lot. I will often ask them to sell me something that is lying on my desk (paper clip, sticky note). Last but not least.. I like to hire someone who has some commonalities with my team. I don't to have clashing personalities on the force, so this is very important.


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    I'm no employer but when I market myself as an employee, I try to show them that I'm a hard worker, smart (even for a little bit), have a sense of humor, a lot of work experience, and flexible. I try to be as neat as possible when it comes to a job interview and I try to answer the questions as articulately as possible. I know that these are some traits that an employer wants. So far, I have never been turned down by a company. Not even once.


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    For me, since I'm in the design business, I'm generally look for people who're passionate about their work. It's easier for me in a sense, since a prospective employee's portfolio is usually enough to determine whether he or she is suitable for the job.

    That said, I also look to learn more about an interviewee's personality. A project is always a team effort, which is why everyone needs to be able to work well together.


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    Honestly, I look for Honest people preferably Christians. I believe real and honest Christians get more job done. I'm hoping to grow a company which employs Christians and even a school perhaps. I don't like dishonest people who don't care about you or your business. People are like family and my business is like family too so I am picky when it comes to employees.


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    I don't know if this tip will relate wholly to your problem, but here's a tip that is pretty effective for dealing with situations like these.

    Try and think of yourself as a prospective employee and go through the motions of setting up an interview, doing research on the firm, asking others for advice, etc about you own company.

    Remember, you need to become a completely different person and look at this company (your company) from a totally fresh and outsider perspective. After you try this out, you'll have a better idea as to how prospective employees approach and look at your company.

    It should work..


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    Quote Originally Posted by fredkawig View Post
    Honestly, I look for Honest people preferably Christians. I believe real and honest Christians get more job done. I'm hoping to grow a company which employs Christians and even a school perhaps. I don't like dishonest people who don't care about you or your business. People are like family and my business is like family too so I am picky when it comes to employees.
    To prefer people from a particular religion is insulting. I'm sorry, but there are SO MANY non-christians that are perfectly decent, hard-working, and honest individuals that to say something to bigoted is particularly offensive to myself. I am not a Christian, so are you calling me dishonest? That was a VERY controversial post.

    Quote Originally Posted by Qraqq View Post
    I don't know if this tip will relate wholly to your problem, but here's a tip that is pretty effective for dealing with situations like these.

    Try and think of yourself as a prospective employee and go through the motions of setting up an interview, doing research on the firm, asking others for advice, etc about you own company.

    Remember, you need to become a completely different person and look at this company (your company) from a totally fresh and outsider perspective. After you try this out, you'll have a better idea as to how prospective employees approach and look at your company.

    It should work..
    I'm sorry but that really in no way relates to the main topic of this thread, which is what employers look for in employees, not what employees look for in employers.

    As for everyone else I'm liking the responses, keep 'em comin'!


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    I'd say if all interviewees are academically qualified then from the questions asked during the interview I'd have to select the one who will work most efficiently in a team. After all, for a business to succeed you all have to work together to achieve that. Other factors such as intelligence and confidence would come in second and third respectively.


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