Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 61
  1. Collapse Details
    Quote Originally Posted by Gmac9100 View Post
    I would advise you to stay away from work-place romance. Those situations always get messy. You do not want that at your place of business. I know that it is hard to do sometimes, but you have to be professional. Do the right thing, and spare your company the drama of that relationship turning sour.
    I agree but this doesnt have to be the rule. I personally know a great couple who met and still work as co-workers. You cna try it but you have to be aware that its dangerous.


    Share on facebook


    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
    It looks bad in every aspect. One, your employees, whether you do or not, WILL ALWAYS accuse you of favoring whomever it is. It creates the feel of favouritism in the workplace. For two, it is HIGHLY unprofessional. Nothing quite like productivity being lost over romance. And finally, when and if a falling out occurs, you might as well be prepared to cross both employees off the list.


    Share on facebook


    Try Amazon Prime for 30-days for FREE! Just click on the text that says Amazon Prime!. It's like Netflix with a MUCH larger selection, you WON'T regret it!
    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
    A local bank in my area actually forbid employees from pursuing workplace romance. In their eyes, if there's employees who are related in some kind of way, and they are situated in different departments, they might apply their knowledge in different aspects of the place and come out with ways to get money into their own pocket while disguising the transactions as something legal. Aside from that, they deduce that favoritism might occurred if there's romance or family involved between certain employees and it is not a healthy work ethnic.


    Share on facebook


    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
    Quote Originally Posted by earthmama1 View Post
    How would you handle a situation where you are going on dates with someone that works for your company? Always sure though to keep it completly professional at the work place, no one would even know. How do you go about taking it to the next level? Having them leave the company? It would be weird for my employees to see something like that, he has been working with me for years and I just dont know how some would handle it.
    I think there is nothing wrong in having a relationship with a co-worker, as long as you are acting professional at the workplace or you are able to separate personal from professional life. However, it is crucial to check first if this is actually allowed in the company. If it's not allowed, then you have to respect that and make adjustments based on that. It may be necessary that one of you may need to move out of the company.

    Overall, however, not too many companies actually prohibit this.


    Share on facebook


    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
    There shouldn't be any work place romance. I agree because most of the time it doesn't work out then there's a problem
    on the job with the couple and that isn't good for the company.


    Share on facebook


    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
    Quote Originally Posted by earthmama1 View Post
    Always sure though to keep it completely professional at the work place, no one would even know.
    This isn't true, people will know. From what I gather, you own the company. In this dynamic, I would say avoid a workplace romance at all cost with one of your employees. He's "sleeping with the boss" is one of the most toxic things that can enter the workplace. There is nothing you can do to regain a feeling of equity amongst your employees. Everyone will view you as having a favorable bias towards your significant other, even if no bias exists.


    Share on facebook


    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
    I don't think there is a standard rule for this, to be honest. You just either risk it or you don't. There are just too many variable factors because every company is different including the employees in it and not to mention relationships are also all very different from each other as well. It's just a matter of setting priorities and boundaries where they are necessary and finding out which paths are best to take regarding which aspects you ultimately chose to prioritize.


    Share on facebook


    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
    No, co-worker relationships always end up being bad. Once things go sour between the two they won't be able to stand near each other and may even be a bother to one another in the workplace. Which is not what you want when you're paying them for doing a job and they're not doing because they're being distracted by someone in the same workplace.


    Share on facebook


    Reply With Quote
     

  9. Collapse Details
    It's tricky, but you obviously should follow your heart in situations like these. In larger companies you will disclose with HR, and in smaller companies a talk with the boss will suffice. Tread lightly, and make sure your arrangement is mutual and you have some understanding of what happens if the relationship ends. Don't hide it, and be transparent with fellow employees so they feel like they are being kept in the loop---otherwise, the feeling of nepotism will arise whether you like it or not.


    Share on facebook


    Reply With Quote
     

  10. Collapse Details
    I don't mind if two workers date each other as long as they don't bring their personal lives at work. Most people who are in love are more inspired and motivated to work. People can't really avoid feelings but they should make sure they value their jobs as much as they value their relationship. They also need to learn how to control their emotions so if ever they fight, they don't put their jobs at risk.


    Share on facebook


    Reply With Quote
     

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •